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UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549

FORM 10-K

 
ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the year ended September 30, 2019

OR

 
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 or 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

Commission File No. 1-06620

GRIFFON CORPORATION
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

Delaware
 
 
11-1893410
(State or other jurisdiction
 
 
(I.R.S. Employer
of incorporation or organization)
 
 
Identification No.)
 
 
 
 
712 Fifth Ave, 18th Floor
New York
New York
10019
(Address of Principal Executive Offices)
(Zip Code)
 
 
 
 

(212) 957-5000
(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)



Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
 
Title of each class
Trading Symbol(s)
Name of each exchange on
which registered
 
 
Common Stock, $0.25 par value
GFF
New York Stock Exchange
 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:
None

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes x
No o

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act. Yes o
No x

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes x No o




Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such period that the registrant was required to submit such files). Yes x No o

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See definitions of “large accelerated filer”, “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act:

Large accelerated filer
Accelerated filer   
o
Non-accelerated filer
o

Smaller reporting company
 
 
Emerging growth company

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. ☐

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act). Yes No S

The aggregate market value of the voting and non-voting common stock held by non-affiliates of the registrant as of the close of business March 31, 2019, the registrant’s most recently completed second quarter, was approximately $764,000,000. The registrant’s closing price as reported by the New York Stock Exchange-Composite Transactions for March 31, 2019 was $18.48. The number of the registrant’s outstanding shares was 46,806,076 as of October 31, 2019.

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE:

Part III — (Items 10, 11, 12, 13 and 14). Registrant’s definitive proxy statement to be filed pursuant to Regulation 14A of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.




Special Notes Regarding Forward-Looking Statements
 
This Annual Report on Form 10-K, especially “Management’s Discussion and Analysis”, contains certain “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, and the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Such statements relate to, among other things, income (loss), earnings, cash flows, revenue, changes in operations, operating improvements, industries in which Griffon Corporation (the “Company” or “Griffon”) operates and the United States and global economies. Statements in this Form 10-K that are not historical are hereby identified as “forward-looking statements” and may be indicated by words or phrases such as “anticipates,” “supports,” “plans,” “projects,” “expects,” “believes,” “should,” “would,” “could,” “hope,” “forecast,” “management is of the opinion,” “may,” “will,” “estimates,” “intends,” “explores,” “opportunities,” the negative of these expressions, use of the future tense and similar words or phrases. Such forward-looking statements are subject to inherent risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from those expressed in any forward-looking statements. These risks and uncertainties include, among others: current economic conditions and uncertainties in the housing, credit and capital markets; Griffon’s ability to achieve expected savings from cost control, restructuring, integration and disposal initiatives; the ability to identify and successfully consummate, and integrate, value-adding acquisition opportunities; increasing competition and pricing pressures in the markets served by Griffon’s operating companies; the ability of Griffon’s operating companies to expand into new geographic and product markets, and to anticipate and meet customer demands for new products and product enhancements and innovations; reduced military spending by the government on projects for which Griffon's Telephonics Corporation supplies products, including as a result of defense budget cuts or other government actions; the ability of the federal government to fund and conduct its operations; increases in the cost or lack of availability of raw materials such as resin, wood and steel, components or purchased finished goods, including any potential impact on costs or availability resulting from tariffs; changes in customer demand or loss of a material customer at one of Griffon’s operating companies; the potential impact of seasonal variations and uncertain weather patterns on certain of Griffon’s businesses; political events that could impact the worldwide economy; a downgrade in Griffon’s credit ratings; changes in international economic conditions including interest rate and currency exchange fluctuations; the reliance by certain of Griffon’s businesses on particular third party suppliers and manufacturers to meet customer demands; the relative mix of products and services offered by Griffon’s businesses, which impacts margins and operating efficiencies; short-term capacity constraints or prolonged excess capacity; unforeseen developments in contingencies, such as litigation, regulatory and environmental matters; unfavorable results of government agency contract audits of Telephonics Corporation; Griffon’s ability to adequately protect and maintain the validity of patent and other intellectual property rights; the cyclical nature of the businesses of certain of Griffon’s operating companies; possible terrorist threats and actions and their impact on the global economy; Griffon's ability to service and refinance its debt; and the impact of recent and future legislative and regulatory changes, including, without limitation, the "Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017" ("TCJA") of December 22, 2017. Readers are cautioned not to place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements. These forward-looking statements speak only as of the date made. Griffon undertakes no obligation to publicly update or revise any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise, except as required by law.


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(Unless otherwise indicated, any reference to years or year-end refers to the fiscal year ending September 30 and US dollars and non-US currencies are in thousands, except per share data)

PART I
Item 1. Business

Overview

Griffon Corporation (the “Company” or “Griffon”, "we", "us") is a diversified management and holding company that conducts business through wholly-owned subsidiaries. The Company was founded in 1959, is a Delaware corporation headquartered in New York, N.Y. and is listed on the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE:GFF).

Business Strategy

We own and operate, and seek to acquire, businesses in multiple industries and geographic markets. Our objective is to maintain leading positions in the markets we serve by providing innovative, branded products with superior quality and industry-leading service. We place emphasis on our iconic and well-respected brands, which helps to differentiate us and our offerings from our competitors and strengthens our relationship with our customers and those who ultimately use our products.

Through operating a diverse portfolio of businesses, we expect to reduce variability caused by external factors such as market cyclicality, seasonality, and weather. We achieve diversity by providing various product offerings and brands through multiple sales and distribution channels, and conducting business across multiple countries which we consider our home markets.

Griffon oversees the operations of its subsidiaries, allocates resources among them and manages their capital structures. Griffon provides direction and assistance to its subsidiaries in connection with acquisition and growth opportunities as well as in connection with divestitures. As long-term investors, having substantial experience in a variety of industries, our intent is to continue the growth and strengthening of our existing businesses, and to diversify further through investments in our businesses and through acquisitions.

As described in greater detail below, over the past three years, we have undertaken a series of transformative transactions. This year we integrated our most significant acquisitions into our wholly owned subsidiaries, The AMES Companies, Inc. ("AMES") and Clopay Corporation ("Clopay"), expanding the scope of both AMES and Clopay. In particular, CornellCookson has been integrated into Clopay, so that our leading company in residential garage doors and sectional commercial doors now includes a leading manufacturer of rolling steel doors and grille products. ClosetMaid was combined with AMES, and we established an integrated headquarters for AMES in Orlando, Florida. AMES is now positioned to fulfill its mission of Bringing Brands Together™ with the leading brands in home and garage organization, outdoor décor, and lawn, garden and cleaning tools. As a result of the expanded scope of the AMES and Clopay businesses, we now report each as a separate segment. Clopay remains in the Home and Building Products segment and AMES now constitutes our new Consumer and Professional Products segment.

Business Highlights

On September 5, 2017, Griffon announced the acquisition of ClosetMaid LLC ("ClosetMaid") and the commencement of the strategic alternatives process for Clopay Plastic Products, beginning the transformation of Griffon.

In October 2017, we acquired ClosetMaid from Emerson Electric Co. (NYSE:EMR) for an effective purchase price of approximately $165,000. ClosetMaid, founded in 1965, is a leading North American manufacturer and marketer of wood and wire closet organization, general living storage and wire garage storage products, and sells to some of the largest home center retail chains, mass merchandisers, and direct-to-builder professional installers in North America. We believe that ClosetMaid is the leading brand in its category, with excellent consumer recognition.

In February 2018, we closed on the sale of our Clopay Plastics Products ("Plastics") business to Berry Global, Inc. ("Berry") for approximately $465,000, net of certain post-closing adjustments, thus exiting the specialty plastics industry that the Company had entered when it acquired Clopay Corporation in 1986. This transaction provided immediate liquidity and positions the Company to improve its cash flow conversion given the historically higher capital needs of the Plastics operations as compared to Griffon’s remaining businesses.


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In March 2018, we announced the combination of the ClosetMaid operations with those of AMES. ClosetMaid generated over $300,000 in revenue in the first twelve months after the acquisition, and we anticipate the integration with AMES will unlock additional value given the complementary products, customers, warehousing and distribution, manufacturing, and sourcing capabilities of the two businesses.

In June 2018, Clopay acquired CornellCookson, Inc. ("CornellCookson"), a leading provider of rolling steel service doors, fire doors, and grilles, for an effective purchase price of approximately $170,000. This transaction strengthened Clopay's strategic portfolio with a line of commercial rolling steel door products to complement Clopay's sectional door offerings in the commercial industry, and expands the Clopay network of professional dealers focused on the commercial market. CornellCookson generated over $200,000 in revenue in its first full year of operations.

During fiscal 2017 and 2018, Griffon also completed a number of other acquisitions to expand and enhance AMES' global footprint. In the United Kingdom, Griffon acquired La Hacienda, an outdoor living brand of unique heating and garden décor products, in July 2017, and Kelkay, a manufacturer and distributor of decorative outdoor landscaping, in February 2018. These two businesses provided AMES with additional brands and a platform for growth in the UK market and give access to leading garden centers, retailers, and grocers in the UK and Ireland.

In Australia, Griffon acquired Hills Home Living, the iconic brand of clotheslines and home products, from Hills Limited (ASX:HIL) in December 2016. In September 2017, Griffon acquired Tuscan Path, an Australian provider of pots, planters, pavers, decorative stone, and garden décor products. These acquisitions broadened AMES' outdoor living and lawn and garden business, strengthening AMES’ portfolio of brands and its market position in Australia and New Zealand.

In November 2017, Griffon acquired Harper Brush Works, a leading U.S. manufacturer of cleaning products for professional, home, and industrial use, from Horizon Global (NYSE:HZN). This acquisition expanded the AMES line of long-handle tools in North America to include brooms, brushes, and other cleaning products.

We believe these actions have established a solid foundation for continuing organic growth in sales, profit, and cash generation and bolsters Griffon’s platforms for opportunistic strategic acquisitions.

In the fourth quarter of fiscal 2019, Griffon modified its reportable segment structure to provide investors with improved visibility after a series of portfolio repositioning actions which included the divestiture of the Plastics business, the acquisition of ClosetMaid and its subsequent integration into AMES, and the acquisition of CornellCookson by Clopay. Griffon now reports its operations through three reportable segments: the newly formed Consumer and Professional Products segment, which consists of AMES; Home and Building Products, which consists of Clopay; and Defense Electronics, which consists of Telephonics Corporation.

Further Information

Griffon posts and makes available, free of charge through its website at www.griffon.com, its annual report on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K and amendments to those reports filed or furnished pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as well as press releases, as soon as reasonably practicable after such materials are published or filed with or furnished to the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”). The information found on Griffon's website is not part of this or any other report it files with or furnishes to the SEC.

For information regarding revenue, profit and total assets of each segment, see the Reportable Segments footnote in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.

Reportable Segments:

Griffon currently conducts its operations through three reportable segments:
 
Consumer and Professional Products ("CPP") conducts its operations through AMES. Founded in 1774, AMES is the leading North American manufacturer and a global provider of branded consumer and professional tools and products for home storage and organization, landscaping, and enhancing outdoor lifestyles. CPP sells products globally through a portfolio of leading brands including True Temper, AMES, and ClosetMaid.



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Home and Building Products ("HBP") conducts its operations through Clopay. Founded in 1964, Clopay is the largest manufacturer and marketer of garage doors and rolling steel doors in North America.  Residential and commercial sectional garage doors are sold through professional dealers and leading home center retail chains throughout North America under the brands Clopay, Ideal, and Holmes. Rolling steel door and grille products designed for commercial, industrial, institutional, and retail use are sold under the CornellCookson brand.

Defense Electronics conducts its operations through Telephonics Corporation ("Telephonics"), founded in 1933, a globally recognized leading provider of highly sophisticated intelligence, surveillance and communications solutions for defense, aerospace and commercial customers.



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Reportable Segments:
 
CONSUMER AND PROFESSIONAL PRODUCTS

The CPP segment consists of AMES. Founded in Massachusetts in 1774, AMES has the distinction of being one of the oldest companies in continuous operation in the United States. Over its long life, AMES has grown organically and through the acquisition of other leading and historic tool businesses such as True Temper, Union Tools, and Garant. Today, AMES is the leading manufacturer of long-handled tools and landscaping products for homeowners and professionals in North America, and also provides these products in key global markets including Canada, Australia, New Zealand, the United Kingdom, and Ireland. With the addition of ClosetMaid, AMES is also the leading provider of wood and wire closet organization, general living storage, and wire garage storage products in the United States.

Since being acquired by Griffon in 2010, AMES has benefited from strategic acquisitions that have expanded its product portfolio and geographic presence. The ClosetMaid, Southern Patio, and Harper Brush Works acquisitions added to AMES' product categories in North America to include storage and organization, decorative landscaping, and cleaning products. The acquisitions of Northcote, Cyclone, Hills, and Tuscan Path in Australia established AMES as a leading supplier of tools and landscaping categories in the Australian market. As a result of the acquisitions of Kelkay and La Hacienda, the United Kingdom and Ireland has become a new key market for AMES products.

AMES has approximately 3,700 employees worldwide.
 
Brands

AMES' brands are among the most recognized across its primary product categories in North America, Australia and the United Kingdom. Its brand portfolio for long-handled tools , outdoor décor, and landscaping product includes AMES®, True Temper®, Garant®, Harper®, UnionTools®, Westmix™, Cyclone®, Southern Patio®, Northcote Pottery™, Nylex®, Hills®, Kelkay®, Tuscan Path®, La Hacienda®, Kelso™, and Dynamic Design®™. Contractor-oriented tool brands include Razor-Back® Professional Tools and Jackson® Professional Tools. AMES' home organization, general living storage, and garage storage products are sold primarily under the ClosetMaid® brand.

This strong portfolio of brands enables AMES to build and maintain long-standing relationships with leading retailers and distributors. In addition, given the breadth of its brand portfolio and product category depth, AMES is able to offer specific, differentiated branding strategies for key retail customers. These strategies have focused on enhancement of brand value, with the goal of de-commoditizing AMES products through the introduction of identity and functionality elements that will make each top brand unique, attractive and visually recognizable by the consumer. The visual brand transformation of the AMES® and Razor-Back® brands was completed in 2015, and the True Temper® line roll-out was completed in 2016. In addition to the brands listed, AMES also sells private label branded products, further differentiating AMES in its customer offerings.

Products
 
AMES manufactures and markets a broad portfolio of long-handled tools, landscaping products, and home organization products. This portfolio contains many iconic brands and is anchored by five core product categories: seasonal outdoor tools, project tools, outdoor décor and watering, home organization, and cleaning products. As a result of brand portfolio recognition, high product quality, industry leading service and strong customer relationships, AMES has earned market-leading positions in its five core product categories. The following is a brief description of AMES' primary product lines:

Seasonal Outdoor Tools
 
Long Handled Tools: An extensive line of engineered tools including shovels, spades, scoops, rakes, hoes, cultivators, weeders, post hole diggers, scrapers, edgers and forks, marketed under leading brand names including AMES®, True Temper®, UnionTools®, Garant®, Cyclone® and Kelso™, as well as contractor-oriented brands including Razor-Back® Jackson® and Darby™.

Wheelbarrows:  AMES designs, develops and manufactures a full line of wheelbarrows and lawn carts, primarily under the AMES®, True Temper®, Jackson® Professional Tools, UnionTools®, Garant® and Westmix™ brand names. The products range in size, material (poly and steel), tray form, tire type, handle length and color based on the needs of homeowners, landscapers and contractors.


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Snow Tools:  A complete line of snow tools is marketed under the True Temper®, Garant® and Union Tools® brand names. The snow tool line includes shovels, pushers, roof rakes, sled sleigh shovels, scoops and ice scrapers.

Pruning: The pruning line is made up of pruners, loppers, shears, and other tools sold primarily under the True Temper®, Cyclone® and Garant® brand names.

Project Tools

Striking Tools:  Axes, picks, mattocks, mauls, wood splitters, sledgehammers, pry bars and repair handles make up the striking tools product line. These products are marketed under the True Temper®, Cyclone®, Garant®, Jackson® Professional Tools and Razor-Back® Professional Tools brand names.

Hand Tools:  Hammers, screwdrivers, pliers, adjustable wrenches, handsaws, tape measures, levels, clamps, and other traditional hand tools make up this product line. These products are marketed under the Trojan®, Cyclone® and Supercraft® brand names. In addition, gardening hand tools, such as trowels, cultivators, weeders and other specialty garden hand tools, are marketed under the AMES® brand name.

Outdoor Décor and Watering

Planters and Lawn Accessories:  AMES is a designer, manufacturer and distributor of indoor and outdoor planters and accessories, sold under the Southern Patio®, Northcote Pottery™, Tuscan Path, La Hacienda®, Hills®, Kelkay® and Dynamic Design®™ brand names, as well as various private label brands. The range of planter sizes (from 6 to 32 inches) is available in various designs, colors and materials.

Garden Hose and Storage:  AMES offers a wide range of manufactured and sourced garden hoses and hose reels under the AMES®, NeverLeak®, Nylex®, and Hills® brand names.

Home Organization: AMES designs, manufactures and sells a comprehensive portfolio of wire and wood shelving, containers, storage cabinets and other closet and home organization accessories primarily under the highly-recognized ClosetMaid® brand name and other private label brands. Wire products include wire shelving and hardware, wire accessories and kitchen storage products. Wire product brands include Maximum Load®, SuperSlide® and ShelfTrack®. Wood solutions include closet systems, cube storage, storage furniture and cabinets. Selected wood product brands include MasterSuite®, Suite Symphony®™, ExpressShelf®, Style+®, and SpaceCreations®.

Cleaning Products: AMES offers a full line of cleaning products for professional, home, and industrial use, including brooms, brushes, squeegees and other cleaning products, primarily under the Harper® brand.

Customers

AMES sells products throughout North America, Australia, New Zealand and Europe through (1) home centers, such as The Home Depot, Inc. (“Home Depot”), Lowe’s Companies Inc. (“Lowe’s”), Rona Inc., Bunnings Warehouse ("Bunnings") and Woodies (with the average length of the relationship with these customers being approximately 30 years); (2) mass market, specialty, and hardware retailers including Wal-Mart Stores Inc. ("Walmart"), Target Corporation ("Target"), Canadian Tire Corporation, Limited ("Canadian Tire"), Costco Wholesale Corporation ("Costco"), Ace, Do-It-Best and True Value Company; (3) industrial distributors, such as W.W. Grainger, Inc. and ORS Nasco, and (4) homebuilders, such as D.R. Horton, KB Home, Lennar and NVR, Inc.
 
Home Depot, Lowe's and Bunnings are significant customers of AMES. The loss of any of these customers would have a material adverse effect on the AMES business and on Griffon.
 
Product Development
 
AMES product development efforts focus on both new products and product line extensions. AMES continually improves existing products as well as develops new products to satisfy consumer needs, expand revenue opportunities, maintain or extend competitive advantages, increase market share and reduce production costs. Products are developed through in-house industrial design and engineering staffs to introduce new products and product line extensions that are timely and cost effective.
 

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Sales and Marketing
 
AMES' sales organization is structured by distribution channel in the U.S., and by country internationally. In the U.S., a dedicated team of sales professionals is provided for each of the large retail customers. Offices are maintained adjacent to each of the two largest customers’ headquarters, supported by a shared in-house sales analyst. In addition, sales professionals are assigned to domestic, wholesale and industrial distribution channels. Sales teams located in Canada, Australia, the United Kingdom and Ireland handle sales in each of their respective regions. In Australia, a dedicated team of sales professionals is provided for the largest retail customer.
 
Raw Materials and Suppliers
 
AMES' primary raw material inputs include resin (primarily polypropylene and high density polyethylene), wood (particleboard and hardwoods including ash, hickory and poplar logs) and steel (hot rolled, cold rolled, and wire rod). All raw materials are generally available from a number of sources. Certain components are purchased, such as heavy forged components and wheelbarrow tires. Most final assembly is completed internally in order to ensure consistent quality. AMES also sources some finished goods.

Competition
 
The long-handled tools and landscaping product industry is highly competitive and fragmented. Most competitors consist of small, privately-held companies focusing on a single product category. Some competitors, such as Fiskars Corporation in the hand tool and pruning tool market and Truper Herramientas S.A. de C.V. in the long-handled and garden tool space, compete in various tool categories. Suncast Corporation competes in the hose reel and accessory market, and more recently in the long-handled plastic snow shovel category and Swan Hose competes in the garden hose market. In addition, there is competition from imported or sourced products from China, India and other low-cost producing countries, particularly in long-handled tools, wheelbarrows, planters, striking tools and pruning tools.
 
The home storage and organizational solutions industry is also highly fragmented. AMES, primarily under the ClosetMaid brands, sells through retail, direct to consumer (e-commerce category) and direct to installer (building) channels and competes with a significant number of companies across each of these unique channels. Principal competition for retail wire products is from Newell Brands, Inc. through their Rubbermaid® product line. FirstService Brands, Inc. sells competing wood solutions under the brand California Closets®, but does not sell through the retail or direct to consumer channels. We believe that AMES' market share in the U.S. is approximately double that of its largest competitors in the home storage and organizational solutions product category.

AMES differentiates itself and provides the best value to customers through its successful history of innovation, dependable supply chain and high on-time delivery rates, quality, product performance, and highly recognized product brands. AMES' size, depth and breadth of product offering, category knowledge, research and development (“R&D”) investment, service and its ability to react to sudden changes in demand from seasonal weather patterns, especially during harsh winter months, are competitive advantages. Offshore manufacturers lack sufficient product innovation, capacity, proximity to market and distribution capabilities to service large retailers or to compete in highly seasonal, weather related product categories.

Manufacturing & Distribution
 
AMES has a combination of internal and external, and domestic and foreign, manufacturing sources from which it sources products for sale in the markets it serves. Principal manufacturing facilities include 644,000 square feet of manufacturing operations in Harrisburg and Camp Hill, Pennsylvania, a 676,000 square foot facility in Ocala, Florida, and a 353,000 square foot manufacturing center in St. Francois, Quebec, Canada. AMES operates smaller manufacturing facilities at several other locations in the United States, and internationally in Reynosa, Mexico; Jiangmen, China; and Grafton, New South Wales and Wonthaggi, Victoria, both in Australia.

AMES has two principal distribution facilities in the United States, a 1.2 million square foot facility in Carlisle, Pennsylvania and a 400,000 square foot facility in Reno, Nevada. Finished goods are transported to these facilities from AMES' manufacturing sites by both an internal fleet, as well as over the road trucking and rail. Additionally, light assembly is performed at the Carlisle and Reno locations. Smaller distribution centers are also strategically located in the U.S. in Ocala, Florida, Chino, California, Belle Vernon, Pennsylvania and Pharr, Texas, and internationally in Canada, Australia, the United Kingdom and Ireland.
 



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HOME AND BUILDING PRODUCTS
 
The HBP segment consists of Clopay. Founded in 1964 and acquired by Griffon in 1986, Clopay has grown organically and through acquisitions to become the largest manufacturer and marketer of garage doors and rolling steel doors in North America. Clopay also manufactures a complete line of entry door systems uniquely designed to complement its popular residential garage door styles. The majority of Clopay's sales come from home remodeling and renovation projects, with the balance from commercial construction and new residential housing construction. Sales into the home remodeling market are driven by the aging of the housing stock, existing home sales activity, and the trends of improving both home appearance and energy efficiency.
 
On June 4, 2018, Clopay acquired CornellCookson, a leading U.S. manufacturer and marketer of rolling steel door and grille products designed for commercial, industrial, institutional and retail use, for $180,000, excluding certain post-closing adjustments. After taking into account estimated tax benefits resulting from the transaction, the effective purchase price was $170,000, subject to certain adjustments. CornellCookson was founded in 1828 as Cornell Iron Works and, in 2008, purchased the Cookson Company, which was founded in 1938, to form CornellCookson. The acquisition of CornellCookson expands Clopay’s existing footprint in the commercial door market and strengthens relationships with professional dealers and installers. Clopay had previously partnered with CornellCookson on customer solutions for over eight years. Consolidating the companies allows Clopay to broaden its existing portfolio of brands, products and customers to serve the commercial market more efficiently with multiple types of doors, and creates additional opportunity to expand our position in adjacent markets. Similar distribution and product composition between the businesses also allows for potential cost savings opportunities across distribution networks and through commodity purchasing.

Clopay has approximately 2,700 employees.

Brands
 
Clopay brings over 50 years of experience and innovation to the residential and sectional garage door industry, and has over 100 years of experience in the rolling steel industry. Residential and commercial sectional products are sold under market-leading brands including Clopay®, America’s Favorite Garage Doors®, Holmes Garage Door Company® and IDEAL Door®. Clopay commercial rolling steel door brands include Cornell®, Cookson®, CornellCookson® and Clopay®.

Products and Service
 
Clopay manufactures a broad line of residential sectional garage doors with a variety of options, at varying prices. Clopay offers garage doors made primarily from steel, plastic composite and wood, and also sells related products, such as garage door openers manufactured by third parties. Clopay also offers a complete line of entry door systems uniquely designed to complement its popular residential garage door styles.
 
Commercial door products manufactured and marketed by Clopay include rolling steel service doors, fire doors, and shutters, steel security grilles, and room dividers. Clopay also manufactures and markets commercial sectional doors, which are similar to residential garage doors, but are designed to meet the more demanding performance specifications of a commercial application.
 
Customers
 
Clopay is currently the exclusive supplier of residential garage doors throughout North America to Home Depot and Menards. The loss of either of these customers would have a material adverse effect on Clopay and Griffon. Clopay distributes its garage doors directly to customers from its manufacturing facilities and through its distribution centers located throughout the U.S. and Canada. These distribution centers allow Clopay to maintain an inventory of garage doors near installing dealers and provide quick-ship service to retail and professional dealer customers.

Product Development
 
Clopay product development efforts focus on both new products and improvements to existing products. Products are developed through in-house design and engineering staffs.
 
Clopay operates technical development centers where its research engineers design and develop new products and technologies and perform durability and performance testing of new and existing products, materials and finishes. Clopay continually improves its door offerings through these development efforts, focusing on characteristics such as strength, design, operating performance and durability, and energy efficiency. The process engineering teams also work to develop new manufacturing processes and production techniques aimed at improving manufacturing efficiencies and ensuring quality-made products.


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 Sales and Marketing
 
The Clopay sales and marketing organization supports our customers, consults on new product development and aggressively markets door solutions, with a primary focus on the North American market. Clopay maintains a strong promotional presence, in both traditional and digital media.

Clopay customers utilize a proprietary residential door web application, the MyDoor® mobile enabled app, that guides consumers through an easy to use visualization and pricing program, allowing them to select the optimal door for their home. For Clopay's commercial products, Clopay's Commercial Door Quoter (CDQ®™) and CornellCookson's WebGen systems are available to assist our professional dealers streamline their quoting and submittal process for greater productivity and backroom efficiency improvement.

Raw Materials and Suppliers
 
The principal raw material used in Clopay's manufacturing is galvanized steel. Clopay also utilizes certain hardware components, as well as wood and insulated foam. All raw materials are generally available from a number of sources.
 
Competition
 
The sectional garage door and commercial rolling steel door industry includes several large national manufacturers and many smaller, regional and local manufacturers. Clopay competes on the basis of service, quality, price, brand awareness and product design.
 
Clopay brand names are widely recognized in the building products industry. Clopay believes that it has earned a reputation among installing dealers and retailers for producing a broad range of innovative, high-quality doors with industry leading lead times. Clopay's market position and brand recognition are key marketing tools for expanding its customer base, leveraging its distribution network and increasing its market share.
 
Manufacturing
 
On January 31, 2019, Clopay announced a $14,000 investment in facilities infrastructure and equipment at its rolling steel manufacturing location in Mountain Top, Pennsylvania.  This project includes a 90,000 square foot expansion to the already existing 184,000 square foot facility, along with the addition of state of the art manufacturing equipment.  Through this expansion, the Mountain Top location will improve its manufacturing efficiency and shipping operations, as well as increase manufacturing capacity to support full-rate production of new and core products. The project is expected to be completed by the end of calendar 2019.
Distribution
 
Clopay distributes its products through a wide range of distribution channels, including a national network of 51 distribution centers. Additionally, products are sold to over 2,500 independent professional installing dealers and to major home center retail chains including Home Depot and Menards (with the average length of the relationship with these customers being greater than 25 years). Clopay maintains strong relationships with its installing dealers and believes it is the largest supplier of sectional garage doors to the retail and professional installing channels in North America and the largest supplier of rolling steel door products in North America. Clopay is currently the exclusive supplier of residential garage doors throughout North America to Home Depot and Menards.

DEFENSE ELECTRONICS
 
Defense Electronics consists of Telephonics Corporation ("Telephonics"). Founded in 1933, Telephonics is recognized globally as a leading provider of highly sophisticated intelligence, surveillance and communications solutions that are deployed across a wide range of land, sea and air applications. Telephonics designs, develops, manufactures and provides logistical support and lifecycle sustainment services to defense, aerospace and commercial customers worldwide. In 2019, approximately 63% of the segment’s sales were to the U.S. Government and agencies thereof, as a prime or subcontractor, 32% to international customers and 5% to U.S. commercial customers. Telephonics is headquartered in Farmingdale, New York and currently has approximately 900 employees.

The U.S. defense budget for government fiscal year (GFY) 2020 is set at $718 billion with the President's defense budget request including major growth to most mission areas. This represents a $33 billion, or 5% increase over the GFY 2019 defense budget

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of $685 billion. Budgets through GFY 2024 increase with a compound annual growth rate ("CAGR") of approximately 1% over the GFY 2020 baseline budget level.

Internationally, demand is growing due to major system capability upgrades in existing systems and re-capitalization of aging assets. Industry reports indicate global defense spending to grow with a CAGR of about 3.5% over the 2016-2026 periods. The U.S. is the largest exporter of defense equipment in the world, and is expected to remain so for the foreseeable future, with significant increases in defense budgets expected in countries that have historically imported defense products from the U.S. such as Saudi Arabia, UAE, Taiwan, Australia, India, South Korea and Japan, among others.

Domestic and international defense market trends bode well for business opportunities for Telephonics products supporting Imaging and Surveillance Radar Systems, Communications, Surveillance and Border Surveillance.

Telephonics is organized into six primary business lines: Radar, Naval & Cyber Systems, Surveillance, Communications, Systems Engineering and Analysis (SEG), and Telephonics Large Scale Integration (TLSI).

Radar: Telephonics provides a wide range of high-performing, lightweight and cost-effective maritime surveillance and weather avoidance radar systems for fixed- and rotary-wing aircraft, Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) and shipboard platforms to the U.S. Government and numerous international defense agencies. Telephonics maritime surveillance radars offer advanced features such as Ground Moving Target Indicator (GMTI), Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR), Inverse Synthetic Aperture Radar (ISAR), Automatic Identification System (AIS) and weather avoidance.

Naval & Cyber Systems: As today’s global leader for maritime surveillance radars, Telephonics is the sole provider of the US Navy’s AN/APS-153 multi-mode radar and the communications suite within the MH-60R/S multi-mission helicopters. With a laser focus on tomorrow, Telephonics is developing the next generation multi-mode maritime and over-land surveillance AESA radar known as Telephonics MOSAIC®. Cyber Systems focuses on ISR aircraft integration design and services with a facility that includes a 7,000 square foot hanger and a Sensitive Compartmented Information Facility (SCIF) capable of supporting various customer and Government agencies “black” programs.

Surveillance: Telephonics is a global leader in Identification Friend or Foe (IFF), Monopulse Secondary Surveillance Radars (MSSR) and Air Traffic Control (ATC) systems enabling military and civilian air traffic controllers to effectively identify aircraft and vehicles as friendly. Telephonics provides both equipment and supporting services required to safely and reliably control flight operations. These systems are used by the U.S. Army, U.S. Navy, U.S. Air Force, U.S. Marines, Federal Aviation Administration ("FAA"), NATO and numerous international defense agencies including those of Japan and South Korea. They have been fielded globally in a wide range of ground, air and sea-based applications.

Communications: Telephonics' advanced wired and wireless communication systems provide the digital backbone for defense and civil platforms worldwide, including fixed- and rotary-wing aircraft, lighter-than-air aircraft and ground control shelters. These systems are designed to meet stringent customer requirements to support adaptability to special missions and communications protocol requirements. Telephonics' vehicle-based intercommunications systems deliver traditional intercom system capabilities while incorporating software-defined features, including an open architecture for integration into vehicle C4 (command, control, communications and computing) systems, networked communications gateways and combat vehicles. Commercial audio products and headsets are utilized worldwide in a wide range of military and civilian applications, including audiometric testing and onboard flight entertainment. Advanced transit communications systems deliver high-quality audio communications and critical travel information, enhancing passenger safety, as well as train crew intelligibility and operational efficiency. Telephonics communications systems are fielded within the U.S. Army, U.S. Navy, U.S. Air Force, U.S. Marines and numerous international defense agencies. These systems are also sold to aerospace manufacturers, commercial airlines and audiometric original equipment manufacturers.

Systems Engineering and Analysis (SEG): SEG provides sophisticated, highly technical engineering and analytic support to customers including the Missile Defense Agency, AEGIS Ballistic Missile Defense Program, Program Executive Offices for Integrated Warfare Systems and Ships, U.S. Naval Surface Warfare Centers, Marine Corps System Command and the U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Command, among others. As a leading provider of combat, radar and missile systems engineering and analysis, SEG is a key source of systems engineering expertise for the U.S. integrated air and missile defense initiatives. In addition to government program offices, SEG works extensively with national laboratories, the Intelligence Community and prime contractors.

Telephonics Large Scale Integration (TLSI): TLSI has designed nearly 400 mixed-signal custom Application Specific Integrated Circuits (ASICs) for customers in the automotive, industrial, defense/avionics and smart energy markets. TLSI works with its customers' technical teams, taking complete responsibility for the ASIC development process, from the

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initial ASIC specification definition through qualification and volume production, to meet the most stringent customer program requirements. Over 10 million ASICs are shipped every year.

To meet the unique challenges of operating in an increasingly complex industry that is faced with continued economic and budgetary pressure on U.S. defense procurement, Telephonics has adapted its core surveillance and communications products, typically used by the U.S. government and its agencies, to meet the needs of international customers in both defense and commercial markets. Telephonics' two largest product lines include maritime surveillance radar and aircraft intercommunication management systems and as Telephonics continues to concentrate on adjacent markets to grow these product lines both domestically and internationally, the company remains focused on delivering high-quality products and services that protect military personnel and civilian interests world-wide.

Telephonics’ leading-edge products and services are well-positioned to address the needs of a fully integrated and modernized battlefield with an emphasis on providing complete situational awareness to the warfighter whether on the ground, in the air or at sea, providing timely, secure and accurate intelligence. Telephonics anticipates that the need for secure, integrated surveillance and communications capabilities will continue to increase as the U.S. and foreign militaries expand their role in fighting terrorism both at home and abroad. Telephonics has also invested in design and development of technologies focused on advanced intelligence and surveillance sensors with applications in both manned and unmanned systems, as well as border and perimeter security markets.
 
Telephonics is a partner in Mahindra Telephonics Integrated Systems, a Joint Venture (JV) with Mahindra Defense Systems in India. The business is focused on providing the Indian defense and civil sectors with surveillance, communications and IFF systems. The JV also intends to provide air traffic management (ATM), border and perimeter security and other surveillance technologies to meet emerging demands.

Programs and Products
 
Based on long-established relationships supported by existing contractual arrangements, Telephonics is a first-tier supplier to prime contractors in the defense industry such as Lockheed Martin Corporation ("Lockheed Martin", which includes Sikorsky Aircraft), The Boeing Company ("Boeing"), Northrop Grumman Corporation ("Northrop Grumman"), Oshkosh Corporation ("Oshkosh"), Airbus Military, Airbus Helicopters, Leonardo (AgustaWestland) Helicopters, and SAAB (with the average length of the relationship with these customers being greater than 20 years), and is a prime contractor to the U.S. Department of Defense and FAA. The significance of each of these customers to Telephonics’ revenue fluctuates on an annual basis, based on the timing and funding of the Original Equipment Manufacturers (“OEM”) contract award, and the technological scope of the work required. Key products include maritime radars, identification friend or foe systems, mobile surveillance and communication systems. The significant contraction and consolidation in the U.S. and international defense industry provides opportunities for established first-tier suppliers to capitalize on existing relationships with major prime contractors and to play a larger role in defense systems development and procurement for the foreseeable future.

Telephonics successfully leveraged its core Surveillance technologies to develop a solution, now fielded by the FAA as a part of the Common Terminal Digitizer (CTD) program, at numerous air surveillance radar sites across the United States. Telephonics expects to continue to leverage its technology to improve the value proposition offered to future FAA radar infrastructure upgrade programs.
 
Telephonics continues to direct resources towards border surveillance and critical infrastructure security initiatives. These opportunities represent strategic advances for Telephonics by enabling it to expand its core technical expertise into the nascent and growing border and perimeter security markets, both in the U.S. and abroad. With many of these programs, system specifications and operational and test requirements are challenging, exacerbated by demanding delivery schedules. Telephonics believes that the technological capabilities these systems encompass will also be able to serve and protect the most complex borders.
 
Backlog

The funded backlog for Telephonics approximated $389,300 at September 30, 2019, compared to $374,200 at September 30, 2018 (restated for the adoption of revenue recognition guidance on October 1, 2018). Approximately 72% of the current backlog is expected to be filled during 2020.

Backlog represents the dollar value of funded orders for which work has not been performed. Backlog generally increases with bookings and converts into revenue as we incur costs related to contractual commitments or the shipment of product. The decrease in backlog was primarily attributed to the timing of various international contract awards associated with radar and surveillance opportunities that were not received by the end of the reporting period. Given the nature of our business and a larger dependency on international customers, our bookings, and therefore our backlog, is impacted by the longer maturation cycles resulting in

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delays in the timing and amounts of such awards, which are subject to numerous factors, including fiscal constraints placed on customer budgets; political uncertainty; the timing of customer negotiations; and the timing of governmental approvals.
Customers
 
The U.S. Government, through prime contractors like Lockheed Martin, Northrop Grumman, Boeing and Oshkosh, is a significant customer of Telephonics. The loss of the U.S. Government or any of its prime contractors as a customer could have a material adverse effect on Telephonics’ business. Notwithstanding the significance of Lockheed Martin, Northrop Grumman and Boeing, Telephonics sells to a diverse group of other domestic and international defense industry contractors, as well as others who use Telephonics products for commercial use.
 
Telephonics participates in a range of long-term defense and non-military government programs, both in the U.S. and internationally. Telephonics has developed a base of installed products that generate significant recurring revenue from product enhancements and retrofits, as well as providing spare parts and customer support. Due to the inherent complexity of these electronic systems, Telephonics believes that its incumbent status on major platforms provides a competitive advantage in the selection process for platform upgrades and enhancements. Furthermore, Telephonics believes that its ability to leverage and apply its advanced technology to new platforms provides a competitive advantage when bidding for new business.
 
Research and Development (R&D)
 
In order to continue to offer affordable and technologically advanced solutions that provide relevant and required features, Telephonics works closely with prime customers to ensure that there is a future market for its products by investing R&D funds in desired enhancements. Telephonics continually updates its core technologies through internally funded R&D while coordinating with customers at the earliest stages of new program development in an effort to provide solutions well in advance of its competitors. Internally funded R&D costs include basic and applied research initiatives, development activities, and other conceptual formulation studies. Telephonics is a technological leader in its core markets and pursues new growth opportunities by leveraging its systems design and engineering capabilities, and incumbent position, on key platforms.
 
In addition to products for defense programs, Telephonics' technology is also used in commercial applications such as airborne weather, search and rescue radar, and air traffic management systems. Telephonics’ reputation for innovative product design and engineering capabilities, especially in the areas of voice and data communications, radio frequency design, digital signal processing, networking systems, inverse synthetic aperture radar and analog, and digital and mixed-signal integrated circuits, will continue to enhance its ability to secure, retain and expand its participation in defense programs and commercial opportunities.
 
Telephonics often designs its products to exceed customers’ minimum specifications, providing its customers with greater performance, flexibility, and value. Telephonics believes that early participation and communication with its customers in the requirements definition stages of new program development increases the likelihood that its products will be selected and integrated as part of a total system solution.

Telephonics is currently investing in an Active Electronically Scanned Array (AESA) based radar solution to address emerging requirements in the maritime and overland radar markets. Continued investments in the Surveillance product portfolio are expected to result in market penetration opportunities in the ground tactical markets with small form factor passive and active IFF solutions. In addition, development of SkySearch-2020, a next generation Mode S Beacon system, is expected to enable Telephonics to continue pursuing FAA opportunities that align with its core competencies and technologies. Investments in the Communications Systems business line are focused on supporting pilot effectiveness initiatives by addressing cognitive overload conditions through innovative adaptive aural processing algorithms.

Sales and Marketing
 
Telephonics has technical business development personnel who act as the focal point for its marketing activities and sales representatives who introduce its products and systems to customers worldwide.
 
Competition
 
Telephonics competes with major manufacturers of electronic information and communication systems, as well as several smaller manufacturers of similar products. Telephonics endeavors to design high quality and reliable products with greater performance and flexibility than its competitors while competing on the basis of technology, innovative solutions, and price.
 

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Manufacturing Facilities
 
Telephonics’ facilities are located in the U.S., primarily in New York. Telephonics also maintains a Technical Support Services Center in Elizabeth City, North Carolina, which supports aircraft integration and upgrade activities in addition to providing support services to customers. 

Clopay Plastic Products - Discontinued Operations

On February 6, 2018, we completed the sale of our Plastics business to Berry Global Group, Inc. for approximately $465,000, net of certain post-closing adjustments. As a result, Griffon classified the results of operations of the Plastics business as discontinued operations in the Consolidated Statements of Operations for all periods presented and classified the related assets and liabilities associated with the discontinued operations in the consolidated balance sheets. All results and information presented exclude Plastics unless otherwise noted. Plastics is a global leader in the development and production of embossed, laminated and printed specialty plastic films for hygienic, health-care and industrial products and sells to some of the world's largest consumer products companies. See Note 7, Discontinued Operations.

Griffon Corporation
 
Employees
 
As of September 30, 2019, Griffon and its subsidiaries employ approximately 7,300 people located primarily throughout the U.S., Canada, the United Kingdom, Australia, Mexico and China. Approximately 200 of these employees are covered by collective bargaining agreements in the U.S., with the United Steel, Paper and Forestry, Rubber, Manufacturing, Energy, Allied Industrial and Service Workers International Union (an affiliate of the American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations), and the United Food & Commercial Workers International Union. Additionally, approximately 200 employees in Canada are represented by the Trade Union Advisory Committee. Griffon believes its relationships with its employees are satisfactory.

Generally, the total number of employees of Griffon and its subsidiaries does not significantly fluctuate throughout the year. However, acquisition activity or the opening of new branches or lines of business may increase the number of employees or fluctuations in the level of Griffon's business activity, which could in turn require staffing level adjustments in response to actual or anticipated customer demand.
 
Regulation
 
Griffon’s operations are subject to various environmental, health, and employee safety laws and regulations. Griffon believes that it is in material compliance with these laws and regulations. Historically, compliance with environmental laws has not materially affected, and is not expected to materially affect, Griffon’s capital expenditures, earnings or competitive position. Nevertheless, Griffon cannot guarantee that, in the future, it will not incur additional costs for compliance or that such costs will not be material.
 
Telephonics, which sells directly and indirectly to the U.S. government, is subject to certain regulations, laws and standards set by the U.S. government. Additionally, Telephonics is subject to routine audits and investigations by U.S. Government Agencies such as the Defense Contract Audit Agency, the Defense Security Service, with respect to its classified contracts, and other Inspectors General. These agencies review a contractor’s performance under its contracts, cost structure and compliance with applicable laws, regulations and standards, including those relating to facility and personnel security clearances. These agencies also review the adequacy of, and a contractor’s compliance with, its internal control systems and policies, including the contractor’s management, purchasing, property, estimating, compensation, and accounting and information systems.

Customers
 
A small number of customers account for, and are expected to continue to account for, a substantial portion of Griffon’s consolidated revenue from continuing operations. In 2019:
a.
The U.S. Government and its agencies, through prime and subcontractor relationships, represented 10% of Griffon’s consolidated revenue and 63% of Defense Electronics' revenue.
b.
Home Depot represented 18% of Griffon’s consolidated revenue, 28% of CPP's revenue and 13% of HBP's revenue.
 

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No other customer accounted for 10% or more of consolidated revenue. Future operating results will continue to substantially depend on the success of Griffon’s largest customers and Griffon's relationships with them. Orders from these customers are subject to change and may fluctuate materially. The loss of all or a portion of volume from any one of these customers could have a material adverse impact on Griffon’s financial results, liquidity and operations.

Seasonality
 
Griffon’s revenue and income are generally lowest in our first and fourth quarters ending December 31, and September 30, respectively, and highest in our second and third quarters ending March 31, and June 30, respectively, primarily due to the seasonality within the AMES and Clopay businesses. In 2019, 56% of AMES' sales occurred during the second and third quarters compared to 55% in 2018 and 2017. Clopay’s business is driven by renovation and construction during warm weather, which is generally at reduced levels during the winter months, generally in our second quarter. Defense Electronics revenue is generally driven by the delivery requirements of its customers, accordingly, Defense Electronics will often have increased revenue in the latter half of the year due to the U.S. government's annual budget cycle.

Demand for lawn and garden products is influenced by weather, particularly weekend weather during peak gardening season. AMES' sales volume can be adversely affected by certain weather patterns such as unseasonably cool or warm temperatures, hurricanes, water shortages or floods. In addition, lack of snow or lower than average snowfall during the winter season may result in reduced sales of certain AMES' products, such as snow shovels and other snow tools. As a result, AMES' results of operations, financial results and cash flows could be adversely impacted.
 
Financial Information About Geographic Areas
 
Segment and operating results are included in Item 7, Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.
 
For geographic financial information, see the Reportable Segment footnote in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements in Item 8, Financial Statements and Supplementary Data.
 
Griffon’s non-U.S. businesses are primarily in Canada, Australia, the United Kingdom, Mexico and China.
 
Research and Development
 
Griffon’s businesses are encouraged to improve existing products as well as develop new products to satisfy customer needs; expand revenue opportunities; maintain or extend competitive advantages; increase market share and reduce production costs. R&D costs, not recoverable under contractual arrangements, are charged to expense as incurred.

Intellectual Property
 
Griffon follows a practice of actively protecting and enforcing its proprietary rights in the U.S. and throughout the world where Griffon’s products are sold. All intellectual property information presented in this section is as of September 30, 2019.
Trademarks are of significant importance to Griffon’s AMES and Clopay businesses. With 50 years of experience and innovation in the garage door industry, and over 100 years of experience in the rolling steel door industry, Clopay has a significant level of goodwill in its strong family of brands, including: Clopay®, America’s Favorite Doors®; Holmes Garage Door Company®; IDEAL Door®; and the Cornell®, Cookson®, and CornellCookson® commercial door brands. Principal global and regional trademarks used by AMES for its tool and landscape products include AMES®, True Temper®, Garant®, Harper®, UnionTools®, Westmix™, Cyclone®, Southern Patio®, Northcote Pottery™, Nylex®, Hills®, Kelkay®, Tuscan Path®, La Hacienda®, Kelso™, and Dynamic Design®, as well as contractor-oriented brands including Razor-Back® Professional Tools and Jackson® Professional Tools. Storage and home organization brands within AMES include ClosetMaid®, MasterSuite®, Suite Symphony®, Cubeicals®, ExpressShelf®, SpaceCreations®, Maximum Load®, SuperSlide® and ShelfTrack®. The AMES and Clopay businesses have approximately 1,000 registered trademarks and approximately 250 pending trademark applications around the world. Griffon’s rights in these trademarks endure for as long as they are used and registered.
Patents are also important to the AMES and Clopay businesses. Clopay holds approximately 35 issued patents and 25 pending patent applications in the U.S., as well as approximately 10 and 20 corresponding foreign patents and patent applications, primarily related to garage door system components and operation. AMES protects its designs and product innovation through the use of patents, and currently has approximately 325 issued patents and approximately 50 pending patent applications in the U.S., as well as approximately 300 and 25 corresponding foreign patents and patent applications, respectively. Design patents are generally

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valid for fourteen years, and utility patents are generally valid for twenty years, from the date of filing. Griffon's patents are in various stages of their terms of validity.
In the government and defense business, formal intellectual property rights are of limited value. Therefore, the Telephonics business tends to hold most of its important intellectual property as trade secrets, which it protects through the use of contract terms and carefully restricting access to its technology.
Environmental, Social and Governance

We take into account environmental considerations in the management of our businesses.  For example, our newly constructed headquarters for AMES is largely constructed from recycled materials, much of which was scrap material from the manufacture of our products.  ClosetMaid’s wire shelving is manufactured from recycled steel.  Clopay’s garage doors feature energy saving insulation.  Across our facilities, we have installed energy efficient lighting systems that reduce our carbon footprint.  We divested our plastic film business that had the most environmentally controversial issues in connection with the disposal of the diapers and products that incorporated those films.

We are committed to the communities in which our facilities are located. To that end, we have invested in, expanded and continue to expand many of our facilities rather than outsource production. As a result we have created economically productive opportunities for employment for the residents of many of these communities. We also have a broad based employee stock ownership plan ("ESOP") in which the vast majority (over 90%) of our U.S. full-time employees participate (at no cost to them), which aligns the economic interests of these employees with our shareholders and provides these employees with a meaningful ownership stake in our Company. As of September 30, 2019, the shares held in the ESOP represented approximately 12% of our outstanding common stock.

Executive Officers of the Registrant
 
The following is a current list of Griffon’s executive officers:
 
Name
 
Age
 
Positions Held and Prior Business Experience
Ronald J. Kramer
 
61
 
Chief Executive Officer since April 2008, Chairman of the Board since January 2018, Director since 1993, Vice Chairman of the Board from November 2003 to January 2018. From 2002 through March 2008, President and a Director of Wynn Resorts, Ltd. (Nasdaq:WYNN), a developer, owner and operator of destination casino resorts.  From 1999 to 2001, Managing Director at Dresdner Kleinwort Wasserstein, an investment banking firm, and its predecessor Wasserstein Perella & Co. Member of the board of directors of Business Development Corporation of America.
 
 
 
 
 
Robert F. Mehmel
 
57
 
Director since May 2018, President and Chief Operating Officer since December 2012. From August 2008 to October 2012, President and Chief Operating Officer of DRS Technologies (Formerly NYSE:DRS) ("DRS"), a supplier of integrated products, services and support to military forces, intelligence agencies and prime contractors worldwide. From May 2006 to August 2008, Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer of DRS and from January 2001 to May 2006, Executive Vice President, Business Operations and Strategy, of DRS.
 
 
 
 
 
Brian G. Harris
 
50
 
Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer since August 2015. From November 2012 to July 2015, Vice President and Controller of Griffon. From July 2009 to July 2015, Griffon's Chief Accounting Officer. From May 2005 to June 2009, Assistant Controller of Dover Corporation, a diversified global manufacturer (NYSE:DOV). Prior to this time, held various finance and accounting roles with Hearst Argyle Television (Formerly NYSE:HTV), John Wiley and Sons, Inc. (NYSE:JW.A) and Arthur Andersen, LLP.
 
 
 
 
 
Seth L. Kaplan
 
50
 
Senior Vice President, General Counsel and Secretary since May 2010.  From July 2008 to May 2010, Assistant General Counsel and Assistant Secretary at Hexcel Corporation (NYSE:HXL), a manufacturer of advanced composite materials for space and defense, commercial aerospace and wind energy applications.  From 2000 to July 2008, Senior Corporate Counsel and Assistant Secretary at Hexcel.  From 1994 to 2000, associate at the law firm Winthrop, Stimson, Putnam & Roberts (now Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP).


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Item 1A. Risk Factors
 
Griffon’s business, financial condition, operating results and cash flows can be impacted by a number of factors which could cause Griffon’s actual results to vary materially from recent or anticipated future results. The risk factors discussed in this section should be carefully considered with all of the information in this Annual Report on Form 10-K. These risk factors should not be considered the only risk factors facing Griffon. Additional risks and uncertainties not presently known or that are currently deemed immaterial may also materially impact Griffon’s business, financial condition, operating results and cash flows in the future.
 
In general, Griffon is subject to the same general risks and uncertainties that impact other diverse manufacturing companies including, but not limited to, general economic, industry and/or market conditions and growth rates; impact of natural disasters and their effect on global markets; possible future terrorist threats and their effect on the worldwide economy; and changes in laws or accounting rules. Griffon has identified the following specific risks and uncertainties that it believes have the potential to materially affect its business and financial condition.
 
Current worldwide economic uncertainty and market volatility could adversely affect Griffon’s businesses.
 
The current worldwide economic uncertainty and market volatility could continue to have an adverse effect on Griffon during 2020, particularly within the CPP and HBP segments, which is linked to the U.S. housing and the commercial property markets, and the U.S. economy in general. Purchases of many CPP and HBP products are discretionary for consumers who are generally more willing to purchase products during periods in which favorable macroeconomic conditions prevail. Additionally, the current condition of the credit markets could impact Griffon’s ability to refinance expiring debt or obtain additional credit on favorable terms for investments in current businesses or for acquisitions, or may render financing unavailable. Griffon is also exposed to certain fundamental economic risks including a decrease in the demand for the products and services it offers or a higher likelihood of default on its receivables.
 
Adverse trends and general economic conditions, especially those that relate to construction and renovation, will impact Griffon’s business.

The CPP and HBP businesses serve residential and commercial construction and renovation, and are influenced by market conditions that affect these industries. For the year ended September 30, 2019, approximately 45% and 40% of Griffon’s consolidated revenue was derived from the CPP and HBP segments, respectively, which was dependent on renovation of existing homes, new home construction, and commercial non-residential construction, repair and replacement. The strength of the U.S. economy, the age of existing home stock, job growth, interest rates, consumer confidence and the availability of consumer credit, as well as demographic factors such as migration into the U.S. and migration of the population within the U.S., have an effect on CPP and HBP.  To the extent market conditions for residential or commercial construction and renovation are weaker than expected, this will likely have an adverse impact on the performance and financial results of the CPP and HBP businesses.

Griffon operates in highly competitive industries and may be unable to compete effectively.
 
Griffon’s operating companies face intense competition in the markets they serve. Griffon competes primarily on the basis of technical expertise, product differentiation, quality of products and services, and price. There are a number of competitors to Griffon, some of which are larger and have greater resources than Griffon’s operating companies. Griffon's operating companies may face additional competition from companies that operate in countries with significantly lower operating costs.

Many CPP and HBP customers are large mass merchandisers, such as home centers, warehouse clubs, discount stores, commercial distributors and e-commerce companies. The growing share of the market represented by these large mass merchandisers, together with changes in consumer shopping patterns, have contributed to the increase of multi-category retailers and e-commerce companies that have strong negotiating power with suppliers. Many of these retailers import products directly from foreign suppliers to source and sell products under their own private label brands to compete with CPP and HBP products and brands, which puts increasing price pressure on the products of these businesses. In addition, the intense competition in the retail and e-commerce sectors, combined with the overall increasingly competitive economic environment, may result in a number of customers experiencing financial difficulty, or failing in the future. The loss of, or a failure by, one of CPP or HBP customers could adversely impact our sales and operating cash flows.

To address all of these challenges, CPP and HBP must be able to respond to these competitive pressures, and the failure to respond effectively could result in a loss of sales, reduced profitability and a limited ability to recover cost increases through price increases. In addition, there can be no assurance that Griffon will not encounter increased competition in the future, which could have a material adverse effect on Griffon’s financial results.

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The loss of large customers can harm financial results.
 
A small number of customers account for, and are expected to continue to account for, a substantial portion of Griffon's consolidated revenue. Home Depot, Lowe’s and Bunnings are significant customers of CPP, and Home Depot and Menards are significant customers of HBP. Home Depot accounted for approximately 18% of consolidated revenue, 28% of CPP's revenue and 13% HBP's revenue for the year ended September 30, 2019. The U.S. Government and its agencies and subcontractors, including Lockheed Martin and Boeing, is a significant customer of Telephonics, and together accounts for approximately 10% of consolidated revenue and 63% of Defense Electronics segment revenue (Lockheed Martin and Boeing each individually represent less than 10% of consolidated revenue inclusive of such sales to the U.S. Government). Future operating results will continue to substantially depend on the success of Griffon’s largest customers, as well as Griffon’s relationships with them. Orders from these customers are subject to fluctuation and may be reduced materially due to changes in customer needs or other factors. Any reduction or delay in sales of products to one or more of these customers could significantly reduce Griffon’s revenue. Griffon’s operating results will also depend on successfully developing relationships with additional key customers. Griffon cannot assure that its largest customers will be retained or that additional key customers will be recruited. Also, both CPP and HBP extend credit to its customers, which exposes it to credit risk. The largest customer accounted for approximately 20%, 8% and 12% of the net accounts receivable of CPP, HBP and Griffon’s net accounts receivable as of September 30, 2019, respectively. If this customer were to become insolvent or otherwise unable to pay its debts, the financial condition, results of operations and cash flows of CPP, HBP and Griffon could be adversely affected.

Reliance on third party suppliers and manufacturers may impair CPP and HBP ability to meet its customer demands.
 
CPP and HBP rely on a limited number of domestic and foreign companies to supply components and manufacture certain of its products. The percentage of CPP and HBP worldwide sourced finished goods as a percent of revenue approximated 32% and 8%, respectively, in 2019. The percentage of CPP and HBP's worldwide sourced components as a percent of cost of goods sold approximated 12% and 16%, respectively, in 2019. Reliance on third party suppliers and manufacturers may reduce control over the timing of deliveries and quality of both CPP and HBP products. Reduced product quality or failure to deliver products timely may jeopardize relationships with certain of CPP and HBP key customers. In addition, reliance on third party suppliers or manufacturers may result in the failure to meet CPP and HBP customer demands. Continued turbulence in the worldwide economy may affect the liquidity and financial condition of CPP and HBP suppliers. Should any of these parties fail to manufacture sufficient supply, go out of business or discontinue a particular component, alternative suppliers may not be found in a timely manner, if at all. Such events could impact the ability of CPP and HBP to fill orders, which could have a material adverse effect on customer relationships.
 
If Griffon is unable to obtain raw materials for products at favorable prices it could adversely impact operating performance.
 
CPP and HBP suppliers primarily provide resin, wood, steel and wire rod. Both of these businesses could experience shortages of raw materials or components for products or be forced to seek alternative sources of supply. If temporary shortages due to disruptions in supply caused by weather, transportation, production delays or other factors require raw materials to be secured from sources other than current suppliers, the terms may not be as favorable as current terms or certain materials may not be available at all. In recent years, both CPP and HBP have experienced price increases in steel and plastic resins.
 
While most key raw materials used in Griffon’s businesses are generally available from numerous sources, raw materials are subject to price fluctuations. Because raw materials in the aggregate constitute a significant component of the cost of goods sold, price fluctuations could have a material adverse effect on Griffon’s results of operations. Griffon’s ability to pass raw material price increases to customers is limited due to supply arrangements and competitive pricing pressure, and there is generally a time lag between increased raw material costs and implementation of corresponding price increases for Griffon’s products. In particular, sharp increases in raw material prices are more difficult to pass through to customers and may negatively affect short-term financial performance.

CPP is subject to risks from sourcing from international locations, especially China
 
CPP' business is global, with products and raw materials sourced from, manufactured in and sold in multiple countries around the world. There are risks associated with conducting a business that may be impacted by political and other developments associated with international trade. In this regard, certain products sold by CPP in the United States and elsewhere are sourced from China; and raw materials used by CPP may be sourced from China and therefore may have their prices impacted by tariffs imposed on trade between the United States and China.
 

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The sourcing of CPP finished goods, components and raw materials from China are generally subject to supply agreements with Chinese companies. China does not have a well-developed, consolidated body of laws governing agreements with international customers. Enforcement of existing laws or contracts based on existing law may be uncertain and sporadic, and it may be difficult to obtain swift and equitable enforcement or to obtain enforcement of a judgment by a court of another jurisdiction. The relative inexperience of China’s judiciary on matters of international trade in many cases creates additional uncertainty as to the outcome of any litigation. In addition, interpretation of statutes and regulations in China may be subject to government policies reflecting domestic political changes.
 
Because of the volume of sourcing by CPP from China, the ongoing trade dispute between the U.S. and China, including the imposition of tariffs on various Chinese imports into the U.S. at various times since March 2018, represents a continuing risk to CPP revenue and operating performance. Following the initial announcement in March 2018 of a 25% tariff on steel imports and a 10% tariff on aluminum imports, the Trump Administration imposed additional and/or increased tariffs on a wide variety of consumer and industrial items imported from China throughout the remainder of 2018 and 2019 to date. Some of these tariffs were subsequently reduced and/or delayed as the Trump Administration continues to pursue trade negotiations with China. The materials subject to these tariffs include various steel and aluminum finished goods, as well as a variety of resins, fabrics and wood products. As a result of these tariffs and the fluid nature of ongoing trade negotiations, we intend to continue to manage our China supply base, which may include raising prices on certain goods. This may in turn result in reduced sales or the loss of customers and could impact our operating performance.
 
CPP and HBP operations are also subject to the effects of international trade agreements and regulations such as the North American Free Trade Agreement, and the activities and regulations of the World Trade Organization. Although these trade agreements generally have positive effects on trade liberalization, sourcing flexibility and cost of goods by reducing or eliminating the duties and/or quotas assessed on products manufactured in a particular country, trade agreements can also adversely affect CPP and HBP businesses. For example, trade agreements can result in setting quotas on products that may be imported from a particular country into key markets including the U.S., Canada, Australia and the United Kingdom, or may make it easier for other companies to compete by eliminating restrictions on products from countries where CPP and HBP competitors source products.
 
The ability of CPP and HBP to import products in a timely and cost-effective manner may also be affected by conditions at ports or issues that otherwise affect transportation and warehousing providers, such as port and shipping capacity, labor disputes, severe weather or increased homeland security requirements in the U.S. and other countries. These issues could delay importation of products or require CPP and HBP to locate alternative ports or warehousing providers to avoid disruption to customers. These alternatives may not be available on short notice or could result in higher transit costs, which could have an adverse impact on CPP and HBP business and financial condition.

Griffon’s businesses are subject to seasonal variations and the impact of uncertain weather patterns.
 
Historically, overall Griffon revenue and earnings are lower in the first and second quarters ending December 31 and March 31, respectively and higher in the third and fourth quarters ending June 30 and September 30, respectively. Griffon's revenue and earnings are generally lowest in our first and fourth quarters ending December 31, and September 30, respectively, and highest in the second and third quarters ending March 31, and June 30, respectively, primarily due to the seasonality of the AMES business. In 2019, 56% of AMES' sales occurred during the second and third quarters. Clopay’s business is driven by residential renovation and construction, which occurs more during warm weather, than during the winter months, and so revenues and earnings of Clopay are generally lower in the second quarter. Telephonics historically has had higher revenue and earnings in the second half of Griffon's fiscal year ending September 30 (although this has not always been the case).

Demand for lawn and garden products is influenced by weather, particularly weekend weather during the peak gardening season. AMES' sales volumes could be adversely affected by certain weather patterns such as unseasonably cool or warm temperatures, hurricanes, water shortages or floods. In addition, lack of snow or lower than average snowfall during the winter season may result in reduced sales of certain AMES' products such as snow shovels and other snow tools. As a result, AMES' results of operations, financial results and cash flows could be adversely impacted.
Each of Griffon's businesses faces risks related to the disruption of its primary manufacturing facilities.

The manufacturing facilities for each of Griffon's businesses are concentrated in just a few locations, and in the case of CPP, some of these locations are abroad in low-cost locations. Any of Griffon's manufacturing facilities are subject to disruption for a variety of reasons, such as natural or man-made disasters, terrorist activities, disruptions of information technology resources, and utility interruptions. Such disruptions may cause delays in shipping products, which could result in the loss of business or customer trust, adversely affecting Griffon’s businesses and operating results.

18


Manufacturing capacity constraints or increased manufacturing costs may have a material adverse effect on Griffon's business, results of operations, financial condition and cash flows.

Griffon’s current manufacturing resources may be inadequate to meet significantly increased demand for some of its products. Griffon’s ability to increase its manufacturing capacity depends on many factors, including the availability of capital, steadily increasing consumer demand, equipment delivery, construction lead-times, installation, qualification, and permitting and other regulatory requirements. Increasing capacity through the use of third-party manufacturers may depend on Griffon’s ability to develop and maintain such relationships and the ability of such third parties to devote additional capacity to fill its orders.

A lack of sufficient manufacturing capacity to meet demand could cause customer service levels to decrease, which may negatively affect customer demand for Griffon's products and customer relations generally, which in turn could have a material adverse effect on Griffon's business, results of operations, financial condition and cash flows. In addition, operating facilities at or near capacity may also increase production and distribution costs and negatively impact relations with employees or contractors, which could result in disruptions to operations.

In addition, manufacturing costs may increase significantly and Griffon may not be able to successfully recover these cost increases with increased pricing to its customers.

If CPP and HBP do not continue to develop and maintain leading brands or realize the anticipated benefits of advertising and promotion spend, its operating results may suffer.

The ability of CPP and HBP to compete successfully depends in part on the company’s ability to develop and maintain leading brands so that retail and other customers will need its products to meet consumer demand. Leading brands allow both CPP and HBP to realize economies of scale in its operations. The development and maintenance of such brands require significant investment in brand-building and marketing initiatives. While CPP and HBP plan to continue to increase its expenditures for advertising and promotion and other brand-building and marketing initiatives over the long term, the initiatives may not deliver the anticipated results and the results of such initiatives may not cover the costs of the increased investment.

Unionized employees could strike or participate in a work stoppage.
 
At September 30, 2019, Griffon employed approximately 7,300 people on a full-time basis, approximately 6% of whom are covered by collective bargaining or similar labor agreements (all within Telephonics and CPP). If unionized employees engage in a strike or other work stoppage, or if Griffon is unable to negotiate acceptable extensions of agreements with labor unions, a significant disruption of operations and increased operating costs could occur. In addition, any renegotiation or renewal of labor agreements could result in higher wages or benefits paid to unionized employees, which could increase operating costs and as a result have a material adverse effect on profitability.
 
Griffon may be required to record impairment charges for goodwill and indefinite-lived intangible assets.

Griffon is required to assess goodwill and indefinite-lived intangible assets annually for impairment or on an interim basis if changes in circumstances or the occurrence of events suggest impairment exists. If impairment testing indicates that the carrying value of reporting units or indefinite-lived intangible assets exceeds the respective fair value, an impairment charge would be recognized. If goodwill or indefinite-lived intangible assets were to become impaired, the results of operations could be materially and adversely affected.
 
 Telephonics’ business depends heavily upon government contracts and, therefore, the defense budget.
 
Telephonics sells products to the U.S. government and its agencies both directly and indirectly as a first-tier supplier to prime contractors in the defense industry such as Lockheed Martin, Boeing and Northrop Grumman. In the year ended September 30, 2019, U.S. government contracts and subcontracts accounted for approximately 10% of Griffon’s consolidated revenue. Contracts involving the U.S. government may include various risks, including:
 
Termination for default or for convenience by the government;
Reduction or modification in the event of changes in the government’s requirements or budgetary constraints;
Increased or unexpected costs, causing losses or reduced profits under contracts where Telephonics’ prices are fixed, or determinations that certain costs are not allowable under particular government contracts;
The failure or inability of the prime contractor to perform its contract under circumstances in which Telephonics is a subcontractor;

19


Failure to observe and comply with government business practice and procurement regulations such that Telephonics could be suspended or barred from bidding on or receiving awards of new government contracts;
The failure of the government to exercise options for additional work provided for in contracts;
The inherent discretion of government agencies in determining whether Telephonics has complied with all specifications set forth in a government contract; and
The government’s right, in certain circumstances, to freely use technology developed under these contracts.

All of Telephonics’ U.S. Government end-user contracts contain a termination for convenience clause, regardless if Telephonics is the prime contractor or the subcontractor. This clause generally entitles Telephonics, upon a termination for convenience, to receive the purchase price for delivered items, reimbursement of allowable work-in-process costs, and an allowance for profit. Allowable costs would include the costs to terminate existing agreements with suppliers.
 
The programs in which Telephonics participates may extend for several years, and may be funded on an incremental basis. Decreases in the U.S. defense budget, in particular with respect to programs to which Telephonics supplies materials, could have a material adverse impact on Telephonics' financial conditions, results of operations and cash flows. The U.S. government may not continue to fund programs to which Telephonics’ development projects apply. Even if funding is continued, Telephonics may fail to compete successfully to obtain funding pursuant to such programs. Reductions to funding on existing programs or delays in the funding of new opportunities could affect the timing of revenue recognition, and impact Telephonics' and Griffon's results of operations.

Ability of government to fund and conduct its operations
 
The impact of a government shutdown for any duration could have a material adverse effect on Telephonics’ revenues, profits and cash flows. Telephonics relies on government personnel to conduct routine business processes related to the inspection and delivery of products for various programs, to approve and pay certain billings and invoices, to process export licenses and for other administrative services that, if disrupted, could have an immediate impact on Telephonics’ business.
 
Telephonics’ business could be adversely affected by a negative audit by the U.S. Government
 
As a government contractor, and a subcontractor to government contractors, Telephonics is subject to audits and investigations by U.S. Government Agencies such as the Defense Contract Audit Agency, the Defense Security Service, with respect to its classified contracts, other Inspectors General and the Department of Justice. These agencies review a contractor’s performance under its contracts, its cost structure and compliance with applicable laws and standards as well as compliance with applicable regulations, including those relating to facility and personnel security clearances. These agencies also review the adequacy of, and a contractor’s compliance with, its internal control systems and policies, including the contractor’s management, purchasing, property, estimating, compensation, and accounting and information systems. Any costs found to be misclassified or improperly allocated to a specific contract will not be reimbursed, or must be refunded if already billed and collected. Griffon could incur significant expenses in complying with audits and subpoenas issued by the government in aid of inquiries and investigations. If an audit or an investigation uncovers a failure to comply with applicable laws or regulations, or improper or illegal activities, Telephonics may be subject to civil and criminal penalties and/or administrative sanctions, which could include contract termination, forfeiture of profit, suspension of payments, fines, including treble damages, and suspension or prohibition from doing business with the U.S. Government. In addition, if allegations of impropriety are made, Telephonics and Griffon could suffer serious harm to their reputation.
 
Many Telephonics contracts contain performance obligations that require innovative design capabilities, are technologically complex, or are dependent upon factors not wholly within Telephonics' control. Failure to meet these obligations could adversely affect customer relations, future business opportunities, and overall profitability.
 
Telephonics designs, develops and manufactures advanced and innovative surveillance and communication products for a broad range of applications for use in varying environments. As with many of Telephonics' programs, system specifications, operational requirements and test requirements are challenging, exacerbated by the need for quick delivery schedules. Technical problems encountered and delays in the development or delivery of such products, as well as the inherent discretion involved in government approval related to compliance with applicable specifications of products supplied under government contracts, could prevent Telephonics from meeting contractual obligations, which could subject Telephonics to termination for default. Under a termination for default, the company is entitled to negotiate payment for undelivered work if the Government requests the transfer of title and delivery of partially completed supplies and materials. Conversely, if the Government does not make this request, there is no obligation to reimburse the company for its costs incurred. Telephonics may also be subject to the repayment of advance and progress payments, if any. Additionally, Telephonics may be liable to the Government for any of its excess costs incurred in acquiring supplies and services similar to those terminated for default, and for other damages. Should any of the foregoing events occur, it could result in a material adverse effect on Griffon's financial position.

20



Griffon's business could be negatively affected by cyber or other security threats or other disruptions.

Overall, Griffon and its operating companies are subjected to cyber and other security threats common to U.S. businesses. As a U.S. defense contractor, Telephonics, in particular, may be the target of cyber security threats to its information technology infrastructure and unauthorized attempts to gain access to sensitive or highly confidential information that could compromise U.S. security. The types of threats could vary from attacks common to most industries to more advanced and persistent, highly organized adversaries who target Telephonics because of national security information in its possession. If Telephonics is unable to protect sensitive information, its customers or governmental authorities could question the adequacy of its security processes and procedures and its compliance with evolving government cyber security requirements for government contractors. Due to the evolving nature of these security threats, the impact of any future incident cannot be predicted.

The costs related to cyber or other security threats or disruptions could be significant. Security events such as these could adversely affect Griffon's internal operations, future financial results and reputation, as well as result in the loss of competitive advantages derived from research and development efforts and other intellectual property.

If Griffon's subcontractors or suppliers fail to perform their obligations, Griffon's performance and ability to win future business could be harmed.

Griffon relies on other companies to provide materials, major components and products to fulfill contractual obligations. Such arrangements may involve subcontracts, teaming arrangements, or supply agreements with other companies. There is a risk that Griffon may have disputes regarding the quality and timeliness of work performed. In addition, changes in the economic environment, including defense budgets and constraints on available financing, may adversely affect the financial stability of Griffon's supply chain and their ability to meet their performance requirements or to provide needed supplies on a timely basis. A disruption or failure of any supplier could have an adverse effect on Griffon's business resulting in an impact to profitability, possible termination of a contract, imposition of fines or penalties, and harm to Griffon's reputation impacting its ability to secure future business.

Griffon’s companies must continually improve existing products, design and sell new products and invest in research and development in order to compete effectively.
 
The markets for Griffon’s products are characterized by rapid technological change, evolving industry standards and continuous improvements in products. Due to constant changes in Griffon's markets, future success depends on Griffon's ability to develop new technologies, products, processes and product applications. Griffon's long-term success in the competitive retail environment and the industrial and commercial markets depends on its ability to develop and commercialize a continuing stream of innovative new products that are appealing to ultimate end users and create demand. New product development and commercialization efforts, including efforts to enter markets or product categories in which Griffon has limited or no prior experience, have inherent risks. These risks include the costs involved, such as development and commercialization, product development or launch delays, and the failure of new products and line extensions to achieve anticipated levels of market acceptance or growth in sales or operating income.

Griffon also faces the risk that its competitors will introduce innovative new products that compete with Griffon’s products. In addition, sales generated by new products could cause a decline in sales of Griffon’s other existing products. If new product development and commercialization efforts are not successful, Griffon’s financial results could be adversely affected.

Product and technological developments are accomplished both through internally-funded R&D projects, as well as through strategic partnerships with customers. Because it is not generally possible to predict the amount of time required and costs involved in achieving certain R&D objectives, actual development costs may exceed budgeted amounts and estimated product development schedules may be extended. Griffon’s financial condition and results of operations may be materially and adversely affected if:
 
Product improvements are not completed on a timely basis;
New products are not introduced on a timely basis or do not achieve sufficient market penetration;
There are budget overruns or delays in R&D efforts; or
New products experience reliability or quality problems, or otherwise do not meet customer preferences or requirements.


21


Griffon may be unable to implement its acquisition growth strategy, which may result in added expenses without a commensurate increase in revenue and income and divert management’s attention.
 
Making strategic acquisitions is a significant part of Griffon’s growth plans. The ability to successfully complete acquisitions depends on identifying and acquiring, on acceptable terms, companies that either complement or enhance currently held businesses or expand Griffon into new profitable businesses, and, for certain acquisitions, obtaining financing on acceptable terms. Additionally, Griffon must properly integrate acquired businesses in order to maximize profitability. The competition for acquisition candidates is intense and Griffon cannot assure that it will successfully identify acquisition candidates and complete acquisitions at reasonable purchase prices, in a timely manner, or at all. Further, there is a risk that acquisitions will not be properly integrated into Griffon’s existing structure. Griffon closed the acquisitions of La Hacienda, Tuscan Path, ClosetMaid and Harper Brush in the months of July through November 2017, Kelkay in February 2018, and CornellCookson in June 2018. This integration risk may be exacerbated when numerous acquisitions are consummated in a short time period.

In implementing an acquisition growth strategy, the following may be encountered:
 
Costs associated with incomplete or poorly implemented acquisitions;
Expenses, delays and difficulties of integrating acquired companies into Griffon’s existing organization;
Dilution of the interest of existing stockholders;
Diversion of management’s attention; or
Difficulty in obtaining financing on acceptable terms, or at all.

An unsuccessful implementation of Griffon’s acquisition growth strategy, including the failure to properly integrate acquisitions, could have an adverse impact on Griffon’s results of operations, cash flows and financial condition.
 
The loss of certain key officers or employees could adversely affect Griffon’s business.
 
The success of Griffon is materially dependent upon the continued services of certain key officers and employees. The loss of such key personnel could have a material adverse effect on Griffon’s operating results or financial condition.
 
Griffon is exposed to a variety of risks relating to non-U.S. sales and operations, including non-U.S. economic and political conditions and fluctuations in exchange rates.

Griffon and its companies conduct operations in Canada, Australasia, the United Kingdom, Mexico and China, and sell their products in many countries around the world. Sales of products through non-U.S. subsidiaries accounted for approximately 16% of consolidated revenue for the year ended September 30, 2019. These sales could be adversely affected by changes in political and economic conditions, trade protection measures, such as tariffs, the ability of the Company to enter into industrial cooperation agreements (offset agreements), differing intellectual property rights and laws and changes in regulatory requirements that restrict the sales of products or increase costs in such locations. Enforcement of existing laws in such jurisdictions can be uncertain, and the lack of a sophisticated body of laws can create various uncertainties, including with respect to customer and supplier contracts. Currency fluctuations between the U.S. dollar and the currencies in the non-U.S. regions in which Griffon does business may also have an impact on future reported financial results.

Griffon's international sales and operations are subject to applicable laws relating to trade, export controls and foreign corrupt practices, the violation of which could adversely affect operations. Griffon is subject to various anti-corruption laws that prohibit improper payments or offers of payments to foreign governments and their officials for the purpose of obtaining or retaining business. In addition, Griffon is subject to export controls, laws and regulations such as the Arms Export Control Act, the International Traffic in Arms Regulation and the Export Administration Regulations, as well as to economic sanctions, laws and embargoes imposed by various governments or organizations, including the U.S. and the European Union or member countries. Violations of anti-corruption, export controls, or sanctions laws may result in severe criminal or civil sanctions and penalties, including debarment, loss of export privileges and loss of authorizations needed to conduct Griffon's international business, and could harm the ability to enter into contracts with the U.S. Government. Such violations could also result in Griffon being subject to other liabilities, which could have a material adverse effect on Griffon's business, results of operations and financial condition.


22


Griffon may not be able to protect its proprietary rights.
 
Griffon relies on a combination of patent, copyright and trademark laws, common law, trade secrets, confidentiality and non-disclosure agreements and other contractual provisions to protect proprietary rights. Such measures do not provide absolute protection and Griffon cannot give assurance that measures for protecting these proprietary rights are and will be adequate, or that competitors will not independently develop similar technologies.
 
Griffon may inadvertently infringe on, or may be accused of infringing on, proprietary rights held by another party.
 
Griffon is regularly improving its technology and employing existing technologies in new ways. Though Griffon takes reasonable precautions to ensure it does not infringe on the rights of others, it is possible that Griffon may inadvertently infringe on, or be accused of infringing on, proprietary rights held by others. If Griffon is found to have infringed on the propriety rights held by others, any related litigation or settlement relating to such infringement may have a material effect on Griffon’s business, results of operations and financial condition.
 
Griffon is exposed to product liability and warranty claims.
 
Griffon is subject to product liability and warranty claims in the ordinary course of business, including with respect to former businesses now included within discontinued operations. These claims relate to the conformity of its products with required specifications, and to alleged or actual defects in Griffon’s products (or in end-products in which Griffon’s products were a component part) that cause damage to property or persons. There can be no assurance that the frequency and severity of product liability claims brought against Griffon will not increase, which claims can be brought either by an injured customer of an end product manufacturer who used one of Griffon's products as a component or by a direct purchaser. There is also no assurance that the number and value of warranty claims will not increase as compared to historical claim rates, or that Griffon's warranty reserve at any particular time is sufficient. No assurance can be given that indemnification from customers or coverage under insurance policies will be adequate to cover future product liability claims against Griffon; for example, product liability insurance typically does not cover claims for punitive damages. Warranty claims are typically not covered by insurance at all. Product liability insurance can be expensive, difficult to maintain and may be unobtainable in the future on acceptable terms. The amount and scope of any insurance coverage may be inadequate if a product liability claim is successfully asserted. Furthermore, if any significant claims are made, the business and the related financial condition of Griffon may be adversely affected by negative publicity.
 
Griffon has been, and may in the future be, subject to claims and liabilities under environmental laws and regulations.

Griffon’s operations and assets are subject to environmental laws and regulations pertaining to the discharge of materials into the environment, the handling and disposal of wastes, including solid and hazardous wastes, and otherwise relating to health, safety and protection of the environment, in the various jurisdictions in which it operates. Griffon does not expect to make any expenditure with respect to ongoing compliance with or remediation under these environmental laws and regulations that would have a material adverse effect on its business, operating results or financial condition. However, the applicable requirements under environmental laws and regulations may change at any time.
 
Griffon can incur environmental costs related to sites that are no longer owned or operated, as well as third-party sites to which hazardous materials are sent. Material expenditures or liabilities may be incurred in connection with such claims. See the Commitment and Contingencies footnote in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements for further information on environmental contingencies. Based on facts presently known, the outcome of current environmental matters are not expected to have a material adverse effect on Griffon’s results of operations and financial condition. However, presently unknown environmental conditions, changes in environmental laws and regulations or other unanticipated events may give rise to claims that may involve material expenditures or liabilities.
 
Changes in income tax laws and regulations or exposure to additional income tax liabilities could adversely affect profitability.

Griffon is subject to Federal, state and local income taxes in the U.S. and in various taxing jurisdictions outside the U.S. Tax provisions and liabilities are subject to the allocation of income among various U.S. and international tax jurisdictions. Griffon’s effective tax rate could be adversely affected by the 2017 “Tax Cuts and Jobs Act” (“TCJA”) which includes a new U.S. tax on certain off-shore earnings, referred to as Global Intangible Low Tax Income, changes in the mix of earnings in countries with differing statutory tax rates, changes in any valuation allowance for deferred tax assets or the amendment or enactment of tax laws. The amount of income taxes paid is subject to audits by U.S. Federal, state and local tax authorities, as well as tax authorities in the taxing jurisdictions outside the U.S. If such audits result in assessments different from recorded income tax liabilities, Griffon’s future financial results may include unfavorable adjustments to its income tax provision.


23


There are risks associated with Griffon’s indebtedness.

While Griffon’s senior notes, which have limited covenants, are not due until 2022, and while its $350 million revolving line of credit, which is largely undrawn, has greater covenant requirements, there are potential impacts from Griffon’s use of debt to finance certain of its activities, especially acquisitions and expansions, as set forth below.

Compliance with restrictions and covenants in Griffon’s debt agreements may limit its ability to take corporate actions.
 
The credit agreement entered into by, and, to a lesser extent, the terms of the senior notes issued by, Griffon each contain covenants that restrict the ability of Griffon and its subsidiaries to, among other things, incur additional debt, pay dividends, incur liens and make investments, acquisitions, dispositions, restricted payments and capital expenditures. Under the credit agreement, which is largely undrawn, Griffon is also required to comply with specific financial ratios and tests. Griffon may not be able to comply in the future with these covenants or restrictions as a result of events beyond its control, such as prevailing economic, financial and industry conditions or a change in control of Griffon. If Griffon defaults in maintaining compliance with the covenants and restrictions in its credit agreement or the senior notes, its lenders could declare all of the principal and interest amounts outstanding due and payable and, in the case of the credit agreement, terminate the commitments to extend credit to Griffon in the future. If Griffon or its subsidiaries are unable to secure credit in the future, its business could be harmed.

Griffon may be unable to raise additional financing if needed.
 
Griffon may need to raise additional financing in the future in order to implement its business plan, refinance debt, or to acquire new or complimentary businesses or assets. Any required additional financing may be unavailable, or only available at unfavorable terms, due to uncertainties in the credit markets. If Griffon raises additional funds by issuing equity securities, current holders of its common stock may experience significant ownership interest dilution and the holders of the new securities may have rights senior to the rights associated with current outstanding common stock.
 
Griffon’s indebtedness and interest expense could limit cash flow and adversely affect operations and Griffon’s ability to make full payment on outstanding debt.
 
Griffon’s indebtedness poses potential risks such as:
 
A substantial portion of cash flows from operations could be used to pay principal and interest on debt, thereby reducing the funds available for working capital, capital expenditures, acquisitions, product development and other general corporate purposes;
Insufficient cash flows from operations may force Griffon to sell assets, or seek additional capital, which Griffon may not be able to accomplish on favorable terms, if at all; and
Its level of indebtedness may make Griffon more vulnerable to economic or industry downturns.

Griffon has the ability to issue additional equity securities, which would lead to dilution of issued and outstanding common stock.
 
The issuance of additional equity securities or securities convertible into equity securities would result in dilution to existing stockholders’ equity interests. Griffon is authorized to issue, without stockholder vote or approval, 3,000,000 shares of preferred stock in one or more series, and has the ability to fix the rights, preferences, privileges and restrictions of any such series. Any such series of preferred stock could contain dividend rights, conversion rights, voting rights, terms of redemption, redemption prices, liquidation preferences or other rights superior to the rights of holders of Griffon’s common stock. While there is no present intention of issuing any such preferred stock, Griffon reserves the right to do so at any time. In addition, Griffon is authorized to issue, without stockholder approval, up to 85,000,000 shares of common stock, of which 46,806,076 shares, net of treasury shares, were outstanding as of September 30, 2019. Additionally, Griffon is authorized to issue, without stockholder approval, securities convertible into either shares of common stock or preferred stock.

Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments
 
None.

24


Item 2.    Properties

Griffon occupies approximately 9,300,000 square feet of general office, factory and warehouse space primarily throughout the U.S., Canada, Mexico, Australia, United Kingdom and China. For a description of the encumbrances on certain of these properties, see the Notes Payable, Capitalized Leases and Long-Term Debt footnote in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements. The following table sets forth certain information related to Griffon’s major facilities:
Location
 
Business Segment
 
Primary Use
 
Approx.
Square
Footage
 
Owned/
Leased
 
Lease
End Year
New York, NY
 
Corporate
 
Headquarters
 
13,000

 
Leased
 
2025
Farmingdale, NY
 
Defense Electronics
 
Manufacturing/R&D
 
180,000

 
Owned
 
 
Huntington, NY
 
Defense Electronics
 
Manufacturing
 
90,000

 
Owned
 
 
Huntington, NY
 
Defense Electronics
 
Manufacturing
 
100,000

 
Leased
 
2021
Columbia, MD
 
Defense Electronics
 
Engineering
 
46,000

 
Leased
 
2025
Elizabeth City, NC
 
Defense Electronics
 
Manufacturing (Owned), Repair and Service (Leased)
 
46,500

 
Owned / Leased
 
2039
Troy, OH
 
Home and Building Products
 
Manufacturing
 
1,230,000

 
Leased
 
2021
Russia, OH
 
Home and Building Products
 
Manufacturing
 
250,000

 
Owned
 
 
Mountain Top, PA
 
Home and Building Products
 
Manufacturing
 
229,000

 
Owned /Leased
 
2020
Goodyear, AZ
 
Home and Building Products
 
Manufacturing
 
163,000

 
Owned
 
 
Carlisle, PA
 
Consumer and Professional Products
 
Manufacturing, Distribution
 
1,227,000

 
Leased
 
2035
Reno, NV
 
Consumer and Professional Products
 
Manufacturing, Distribution
 
400,000

 
Leased
 
2022
Camp Hill, PA
 
Consumer and Professional Products
 
Manufacturing
 
380,000

 
Owned
 
 
Harrisburg, PA
 
Consumer and Professional Products
 
Manufacturing
 
264,000

 
Owned
 
 
St. Francois, Quebec
 
Consumer and Professional Products
 
Manufacturing, Distribution
 
353,000

 
Owned
 
 
Falls City, NE
 
Consumer and Professional Products
 
Manufacturing
 
82,000

 
Owned
 
 
Champion, PA
 
Consumer and Professional Products
 
Wood Mill
 
225,000

 
Owned
 
 
Cork, Ireland
 
Consumer and Professional Products
 
Manufacturing, Distribution
 
74,000

 
Owned
 
 
Pollington Site, UK
 
Consumer and Professional Products
 
Manufacturing, Distribution
 
115,000

 
Owned
 
 
Gloucestershire, UK
 
Consumer and Professional Products
 
Distribution
 
46,000

 
Leased
 
2022
South Yorkshire, UK
 
Consumer and Professional Products
 
Manufacturing
 
59,000

 
Leased
 
2025
Australia (various)
 
Consumer and Professional Products
 
7 Distribution
 
562,000

 
Leased
 
2020 - 2027
Ocala, FL
 
Consumer and Professional Products
 
Manufacturing
 
676,000

 
Leased
 
2020
Grantsville, MD
 
Consumer and Professional Products
 
Manufacturing
 
155,000

 
Owned
 

Reynosa, MX
 
Consumer and Professional Products
 
Manufacturing (owned), Distribution (leased)
 
133,000

 
Owned /Leased
 
2020
Chino, CA
 
Consumer and Professional Products
 
Distribution
 
202,000

 
Leased
 
2021
Pharr, TX
 
Consumer and Professional Products
 
Distribution
 
80,000

 
Leased
 
2022
Belle Vernon, PA
 
Consumer and Professional Products
 
Distribution
 
300,000

 
Leased
 
2022
Fairfield, IA
 
Consumer and Professional Products
 
Manufacturing
 
54,000

 
Leased
 
2021
Guangdong, China
 
Consumer and Professional Products
 
Manufacturing
 
88,000

 
Leased
 
2021

Griffon also leases approximately 1,100,000 square feet of space for the HBP distribution centers in numerous facilities throughout the U.S. and in Canada. In addition, Griffon leases approximately 100,000 square feet of office space throughout the U.S. CPP also owns approximately 200,000 square feet of additional space for operational wood mills in the U.S.

25



All facilities are generally well maintained and suitable for the operations conducted.

Item 3.    Legal Proceedings

Griffon is involved in litigation, investigations and claims arising out of the normal conduct of business, including those relating to commercial transactions, product liability and warranty claims, environmental, employment, and health and safety matters.  Griffon estimates and accrues liabilities resulting from such matters based on a variety of factors, including the stage of the proceeding; potential settlement value; assessments by internal and external counsel; and assessments by environmental engineers and consultants of potential environmental liabilities and remediation costs.  Such estimates are not discounted to reflect the time value of money due to the uncertainty in estimating the timing of the expenditures, which may extend over several years.

While it is impossible to ascertain the ultimate legal and financial liability with respect to certain contingent liabilities and claims, Griffon believes, based upon examination of currently available information, experience to date, and advice from legal counsel, that the individual and aggregate liabilities resulting from the ultimate resolution of these contingent matters, after taking into consideration existing insurance coverage and amounts already provided for, will not have a material adverse impact on consolidated results of operations, financial position or cash flows.

Item 4.    Mine Safety Disclosures.

Not applicable.


26


PART II


Item 5.    Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

Griffon’s Common Stock is listed for trading on the New York Stock Exchange under the symbol “GFF”.

Dividends

During 2019, 2018 and 2017, the Company declared and paid dividends totaling $0.29 per share, $0.28 per share and $0.24 per share, respectively. In addition, on March 7, 2018, the Board of Directors declared a special cash dividend of $1.00 per share, paid on April 16, 2018 to shareholders of record as of the close of business on March 29, 2018. The Company currently intends to pay dividends each quarter; however, payment of dividends is determined by the Board of Directors at its discretion based on various factors, and no assurance can be provided as to the payment of future dividends.

On November 13, 2019, the Board of Directors declared a cash dividend of $0.075 per share, payable on December 19, 2019 to shareholders of record as of the close of business on November 27, 2019.

Holders

As of October 31, 2019, there were approximately 8,700 holders of Griffon’s Common Stock.

Securities Authorized for Issuance Under Equity Compensation Plans

The following sets forth information relating to Griffon’s equity compensation plans as of September 30, 2019:

 
(a)
 
(b)
 
(c)
Plan Category
Number of
securities to be
issued upon
exercise of
outstanding options,
warrants and rights
(2)
 
Weighted-
average exercise
price of
outstanding
options, warrants
and rights
 (2)
 
Number of securities
remaining available for
future issuance under
equity plans (excluding
securities reflected in
column (a))
Equity compensation plans approved by security
holders (1)

 
$

 
270,937

 
 
 
 
 
 
Equity compensation plans not approved by security holders

 
$

 



(1)
Excludes restricted shares and restricted stock units issued in connection with Griffon’s equity compensation plans. The total reflected in column (c) includes shares available for grant as any type of equity award under the Incentive Plan.
(2)
A stock option to purchase 350,000 shares at an exercise price of $20.00 expired on October 1, 2018.


27


Issuer Purchase of Equity Securities

The table below presents shares of Griffon Stock which were acquired by Griffon during the fourth quarter of 2019:

ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES
 
Period
(a) Total Number
of Shares (or
Units) Purchased
 
 
(b) Average
Price Paid Per
Share (or Unit)
 
(c) Total Number of
Shares (or Units)
Purchased as Part of
Publicly Announced
Plans or Programs
(1)
 
(d) Maximum Number
(or Approximate
Dollar Value) of
Shares (or Units) That
May Yet Be Purchased
Under the Plans or
Programs
 
July 1 - 31, 2019

 
 
$

 

 
 

 
August 1 - 31, 2019

 
 

 

 
 

 
September 1 - 30, 2019

 
 

 

 
 

 
Total

 
 
$

 

 
$
57,955

(1)
 
1.
Shares, if any, purchased by the Company in open market purchases are pursuant to share repurchases authorized by the Company’s Board of Directors. On each of August 3, 2016 and August 1, 2018, the Company’s Board of Directors authorized the repurchase of up to $50,000 of Griffon common stock; as of September 30, 2019, $57,955 remained available for purchase under these Board authorized repurchase programs.





28



Performance Graph
 
The performance graph does not constitute soliciting material, is not deemed filed with the SEC and is not incorporated by reference in any of Griffon’s filings under the Securities Act of 1933 or the Exchange Act of 1934, whether made before or after the date of this Annual Report on Form 10-K and irrespective of any general incorporation language in any such filings, except to the extent Griffon specifically incorporates this performance graph by reference therein.

The following graph sets forth the cumulative total return to Griffon’s stockholders during the five years ended September 30, 2019, as well as an overall stock market (S&P Small Cap 600 Index) and Griffon’s peer group index (Dow Jones U.S. Diversified Industrials Index). Assumes $100 was invested on September 30, 2014, including the reinvestment of dividends, in each category.

COMPARISON OF 5 YEAR CUMULATIVE TOTAL RETURN
Among Griffon Corporation, the S&P Smallcap 600 Index
and the Dow Jones US Diversified Industrials Index



http://api.tenkwizard.com/cgi/image?quest=1&rid=23&ipage=13217750&doc=2
    



29


Item 6.    Selected Financial Data
 
For the Years Ended September 30,
(in thousands, except per share amounts)
2019
 
2018
 
2017
 
2016
 
2015
Revenue
$
2,209,289

 
$
1,977,918

 
$
1,524,997

 
$
1,477,035

 
$
1,483,291

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Income (loss) before taxes and discontinued operations
$
72,178

 
$
33,810

 
$
16,698

 
$
32,213

 
$
19,066

Provision (benefit) for income taxes
26,556

 
555

 
(1,085
)
 
12,432

 
6,772

Income (loss) from continuing operations
45,622

 
33,255

 
17,783

 
19,781

 
12,294

Income (loss) from discontinued operations
(8,335
)
 
92,423

 
(2,871
)
 
10,229

 
21,995

Net Income (loss)
$
37,287

 
$
125,678

 
$
14,912

 
$
30,010

 
$
34,289

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Basic earnings (loss) per share:
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Continuing operations
$
1.11

 
$
0.81

 
$
0.43

 
$
0.48

 
$
0.28

Discontinued operations
(0.20
)
 
2.25

 
(0.07
)
 
0.25

 
0.49

Net income (loss)
$
0.91

 
$
3.06

 
$
0.36

 
$
0.73

 
$
0.77

Weighted average shares outstanding
40,934

 
41,005

 
41,005

 
41,074

 
44,608

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Diluted earnings (loss) per share:
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Continuing operations
$
1.06

 
$
0.78

 
$
0.41

 
$
0.45

 
$
0.26

Discontinued operations
(0.20
)
 
2.18

 
(0.07
)
 
0.23

 
0.47

Net income (loss)
$
0.87

 
$
2.96

 
$
0.35

 
$
0.68

 
$
0.73

Weighted average shares outstanding
42,888

 
42,422

 
43,011

 
44,109

 
46,939

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Cash dividends declared per common share
$
0.29

 
$
1.28

 
$
0.24

 
$
0.20

 
$
0.16

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Capital expenditures
$
45,361

 
$
50,138

 
$
34,937

 
$
59,276

 
$
46,308

Depreciation and amortization
$
61,848

 
$
55,803

 
$
47,878

 
$
46,342

 
$
45,834

Total assets
$
2,074,939

 
$
2,084,890

 
$
1,873,541

 
$
1,782,096

 
$
1,712,813

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Current portion of debt
$
10,525

 
$
13,011

 
$
11,078

 
$
13,932

 
$
8,170

Long term portion of debt, net
1,093,749

 
1,108,071

 
968,080

 
896,946

 
803,617

Total debt, net
$
1,104,274

 
$
1,121,082

 
$
979,158

 
$
910,878

 
$
811,787


Notes:
Results of operations from acquired businesses are included from the date of acquisition.  The fair value of assets and liabilities, inclusive of changes resulting from operating the businesses, are included in the first period ended after the date of each acquisition, and all periods thereafter.

Excludes results of operations and assets and liabilities of discontinued operations for all periods presented unless otherwise noted.

2019 includes a benefit from the reversal of contingent consideration related to the Kelkay acquisition of $1,646 ($1,333, net of tax, or $0.03 per share) and discrete and certain other tax provisions, net, of $2,035 or $0.05 per share.

2018 includes $7,597 of acquisition related costs ($5,047, net of tax, or $0.12 per share), special dividend ESOP charges of $3,220 ($2,125, net of tax, or $0.05 per share), $1,205 of secondary equity offering costs ($795, net of tax, or $0.02 per share), a cost of life insurance benefit of $2,614 ($248, net of tax, or $0.01 per share) and discrete and certain other tax benefits, net, of $9,384, or $0.22 per share.

2017 includes $9,617 of acquisition related costs ($6,145, net of tax, or $0.14 per share), $5,137 of contract settlement charges ($3,300, net of tax, or $0.08 per share) and discrete tax benefits, net, of $8,274, or $0.19 per share.

2016 includes discrete tax benefits, net, of $857 or $0.02 per share.

2015 includes discrete tax benefits, net, of $219 or $0.00 per share.

Due to rounding, the sum of earnings per share of Continuing operations and Discontinued operations may not equal earnings per share or Net income.


30




Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

(Unless otherwise indicated, all references to years or year-end refers to the fiscal year ending September 30 and dollars are in thousands, except per share data)

OVERVIEW

The Company

Griffon Corporation (the “Company”, “Griffon”, "we" or "us") is a diversified management and holding company that conducts business through wholly-owned subsidiaries. Griffon oversees the operations of its subsidiaries, allocates resources among them and manages their capital structures. Griffon provides direction and assistance to its subsidiaries in connection with acquisition and growth opportunities as well as in connection with divestitures. In order to further diversify, Griffon also seeks out, evaluates and, when appropriate, will acquire additional businesses that offer potentially attractive returns on capital.

The Company was founded in 1959, is a Delaware corporation headquartered in New York, N.Y. and is listed on the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE:GFF).

On June 4, 2018, Clopay Corporation ("Clopay") (previously known as Clopay Building Products Company, Inc.) acquired CornellCookson, Inc. ("CornellCookson"), a leading US manufacturer and marketer of rolling steel door and grille products designed for commercial, industrial, institutional and retail use, for an effective purchase price of approximately $170,000. CornellCookson, as expected, generated over $200,000 in revenue in the first full year of operations. The accounts, affected for adjustments to reflect fair market values assigned to assets purchased and liabilities assumed, and results of operations of CornellCookson, are included in the Company’s consolidated financial statements from the date of acquisition of June 4, 2018. See Note 3, Acquisitions.

On November 16, 2017, Griffon announced it entered into a definitive agreement to sell Clopay Plastic Products Company, Inc. ("Plastics") and on February 6, 2018, completed the sale to Berry Global, Inc. ("Berry") for approximately $465,000, net of certain post-closing adjustments. As a result, Griffon classified the results of operations of the Plastics business as discontinued operations in the Consolidated Statements of Operations for all periods presented and classified the related assets and liabilities associated with the discontinued operations in the consolidated balance sheets. All results and information presented exclude Plastics unless otherwise noted. See Note 7, Discontinued Operations.

On October 2, 2017, Griffon acquired ClosetMaid LLC ("ClosetMaid") for approximately $185,700, inclusive of post-closing adjustments, or $165,000 net of the estimated present value of tax benefits resulting from the transaction. ClosetMaid, founded in 1965, is a leading North American manufacturer and marketer of wood and wire closet organization, general living storage and wire garage storage products and sells to some of the largest home center retail chains, mass merchandisers, and direct-to-builder professional installers in North America. ClosetMaid, as expected, generated over $300,000 in revenue in the first twelve months after the acquisition. The accounts, affected for adjustments to reflect fair market values assigned to assets purchased and liabilities assumed, and results of operations of ClosetMaid are included in the Company’s consolidated financial statements from the date of acquisition of October 2, 2017. See Note 3, Acquisitions.

In the fourth quarter of fiscal 2019, Griffon modified its reportable segment structure to provide investors with improved visibility after a series of portfolio repositioning actions which included the divestiture of the Plastics business, the acquisition of ClosetMaid and its subsequent integration into The AMES Companies, Inc. (“AMES”), and the acquisition of CornellCookson by Clopay. Griffon now reports its operations through three reportable segments: the newly formed Consumer and Professional Products segment, which consists of AMES; Home and Building Products, which consists of Clopay; and Defense Electronics, which consists of Telephonics Corporation.

Griffon currently conducts its continuing operations through three reportable segments:

Consumer and Professional Products ("CPP") conducts its operations through AMES. Founded in 1774, AMES is the leading North American manufacturer and a global provider of branded consumer and professional tools and products for home storage and organization, landscaping, and enhancing outdoor lifestyles. CPP sells products globally through a portfolio of leading brands including True Temper, AMES, and ClosetMaid. CPP revenue was 45%, 48%, and 36% of Griffon’s consolidated revenue in 2019, 2018 and 2017, respectively.


31


Home and Building Products ("HBP") conducts its operations through Clopay. Founded in 1964, Clopay is the largest manufacturer and marketer of garage doors and rolling steel doors in North America.  Residential and commercial sectional garage doors are sold through professional dealers and leading home center retail chains throughout North America under the brands Clopay, Ideal, and Holmes. Rolling steel door and grille products designed for commercial, industrial, institutional, and retail use are sold under the CornellCookson brand. HBP revenue was 40%, 35% and 37% of Griffon’s consolidated revenue in 2019, 2018 and 2017, respectively.

Defense Electronics conducts its operations through Telephonics Corporation ("Telephonics"), founded in 1933, a globally recognized leading provider of highly sophisticated intelligence, surveillance and communications solutions for defense, aerospace and commercial customers. Telephonics’ revenue was 15%, 17% and 27% of Griffon’s consolidated revenue in 2019, 2018 and 2017, respectively.

CONSOLIDATED RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

2019 Compared to 2018

Revenue from continuing operations for the year ended September 30, 2019 was $2,209,289, compared to $1,977,918 in the year ended September 30, 2018, an increase of 12%, primarily driven by increased revenue at CPP and HBP from both recent acquisitions and organic growth, and increased revenue at Defense Electronics. Organic growth was 5%. Gross profit for 2019 was $595,269 compared to $529,181 in 2018, with gross margin as a percent of sales (“gross margin”) of 26.9% in 2019, compared to 26.8% in 2018.

Selling, general and administrative (“SG&A”) expenses from continuing operations in 2019 of $460,004 increased 5% from 2018 of $436,380. The 2019 SG&A expenses include income from the reversal of contingent consideration related to the Kelkay acquisition of $1,646. The 2018 SG&A expenses included acquisition costs of $7,597, special dividend ESOP charges of $3,220, cost of a life insurance benefit of $2,614 and secondary offering costs of $1,205. Excluding these items from both periods the 2019 SG&A expenses increased 9% over 2018 primarily related to the June 4, 2018 acquisition of CornellCookson and increased distribution and related freight costs at HBP due to increased sales volume. SG&A for 2019, as a percent of revenue, was 20.8% compared to 22.1% in 2018, or 20.9% and 21.3%, respectively, excluding the items detailed above.

Interest expense from continuing operations in 2019 of $68,066 increased 3.8% compared to 2018 of $65,568, primarily as a result of increased outstanding borrowings and interest rates on our Revolving Credit Facility.

Other income (expense) from continuing operations of $4,173 in 2019 and $4,880 in 2018 consists primarily of currency exchange transaction gains and losses from receivables and payables held in non-functional currencies, and net gains or losses on investments. Additionally, Other income (expense) included net periodic benefit plan income of $3,148 and $3,649, respectively. Effective October 1, 2018, these benefit amounts are required to be included in other income; in the past these were in Cost of goods and services and Selling, general and administrative expenses as a result of implementation of the new accounting standard on pensions. All periods have been restated. See Note 11 - Employee Benefit Plans for further information on the implementation of this guidance.

Griffon reported pretax income from continuing operations for 2019 of $72,178 compared to $33,810 for 2018. In 2019, the Company recognized a tax provision of 36.8% compared to 1.6% in 2018.  The 2019 tax rate included $2,035 of discrete and certain other tax provisions, net. The 2018 tax rate included $9,384 of discrete and certain other tax benefits, net, primarily from the revaluation of deferred tax liabilities and the provisional amount recorded for the IRC section 965 transition tax on the untaxed foreign earnings net of foreign tax credits, related to the TCJA.

Excluding the discrete and certain other tax benefits, net, and certain other items from continuing operations, as listed below, the effective tax rates for 2019 and 2018 were 34.3% and 33.8%, respectively. These rates reflect the impact of tax reserves and changes in earnings mix between U.S. and non-U.S. operations.

Income from continuing operations for 2019 was $45,622, or $1.06 per share, compared to $33,255, or $0.78 per share in 2018.

The 2019 Income from continuing operations included a benefit from the reversal of contingent consideration related to the Kelkay acquisition of $1,646 ($1,333, net of tax, or $0.03 per share) and discrete and certain other tax provisions, net, of $2,035 or $0.05 per share.


32


The 2018 income from continuing operations included the following:

–    Acquisition costs of $7,597 ($5,047, net of tax, or $0.12 per share);
–    Special dividend ESOP charges of $3,220 ($2,125, net tax, or $0.05);
–    Secondary equity offering costs of $1,205 ($795, net tax, or $0.02);
–    Cost of life insurance benefit of $2,614 ($248, net tax, or $0.01); and
–    Discrete and certain other tax benefits, net, of $9,384 or $0.22 per share, primarily from the revaluation of deferred tax liabilities and the provisional amount recorded for the IRC section 965 transition tax on the untaxed foreign earnings net of foreign tax credits related to the TCJA.

Excluding these items from both reporting periods, 2019 Income from continuing operations would have been $46,324, or $1.08 per share compared to $32,086, or $0.76 per share, in 2018.

2018 Compared to 2017

Revenue from continuing operations for the year ended September 30, 2018 was $1,977,918, compared to $1,524,997 in the year ended September 30, 2017, an increase of 30%, primarily driven by increased revenue at CPP and HBP from both recent acquisitions and organic growth, partially offset by decreased revenue at Defense Electronics. Gross profit for 2018 was $529,181 compared to $408,126 in 2017, with gross margin as a percent of sales (“gross margin”) of 26.8% in 2018, consistent with 2017.

Selling, general and administrative (“SG&A”) expenses from continuing operations in 2018 of $436,380 increased 28% from 2017 of $341,092. The 2018 SG&A expenses included acquisition costs of $7,597, special dividend ESOP charges of $3,220, cost of a life insurance benefit of $2,614 and secondary offering costs of $1,205. The 2017 SG&A expenses included acquisition costs of $9,617 and contract settlement charges of $5,137. Excluding these items from both periods, the 2018 SG&A expenses increased 29% over 2017 primarily related to incremental SG&A expenses associated with acquisitions. SG&A for 2018, as a percent of revenue, was 22.1%, compared to 22.4% for 2017, or 21.3% and 21.4%, respectively, excluding the items detailed above.

Interest expense from continuing operations in 2018 of $65,568 increased 27% compared to 2017 of $51,513, primarily as a result of increased debt levels related to the October 2017 add-on offering of $275,000 of 5.25% senior notes due 2022, partially offset by lower outstanding borrowings on our Revolving Credit Facility.

Other income (expense) from continuing operations of $4,880 in 2018 and $1,113 in 2017 consists primarily of currency exchange transaction gains and losses from receivables and payables held in non-functional currencies, and net gains on investments. Additionally, Other income (expense) included net periodic benefit plan income of $3,649 and $1,993, respectively. Effective October 1, 2018, these benefits amounts are required to be included in other income; in the past these were in Cost of goods and services and Selling, general and administrative expenses, as a result of implementation of the new accounting standard on pensions. All periods have been restated. See Note 11 - Employee Benefit Plans for further information on the implementation of this guidance.

Griffon reported pretax income from continuing operations of $33,810 for 2018 compared to $16,698 for 2017. In 2018, the Company recognized a tax provision of 1.6% compared to 6.5% in 2017.  The 2018 tax rate included $9,384 of discrete and certain other tax benefits, net, primarily from the revaluation of deferred tax liabilities and the provisional amount recorded for the IRC section 965 transition tax on the untaxed foreign earnings net of foreign tax credits, related to the TCJA. The 2017 tax rate included $8,274 of discrete and certain other tax benefits, net, related primarily to excess tax benefits from the vesting of equity awards within income tax expense, a federal domestic production activities deduction and a federal R&D credit.

Excluding the discrete and certain other tax benefits, net, and certain other items from continuing operations, as listed below, the effective tax rates for 2018 and 2017 were 33.8% and 39.7%, respectively. These rates reflect the impact of tax reserves and changes in earnings mix between U.S. and non-U.S. operations.

Income from continuing operations was $33,255, or $0.78 per share, for 2018 compared to $17,783, or $0.41 per share in 2017.
The 2018 Income from continuing operations included the following:

–    Acquisition costs of $7,597 ($5,047, net of tax, or $0.12 per share);

33


–    Special dividend ESOP charges of $3,220 ($2,125, net tax, or $0.05);
–    Secondary equity offering costs of $1,205 ($795, net tax, or $0.02);
–    Cost of life insurance benefit of $2,614 ($248, net tax, or $0.01); and
–    Discrete and certain other tax benefits, net, of $9,384 or $0.22 per share, primarily from the revaluation of deferred tax liabilities and the provisional amount recorded for the IRC section 965 transition tax on the untaxed foreign earnings net of foreign tax credits related to the TCJA.

The 2017 Income from continuing operations included the following:
Acquisition costs of $9,617 ($6,145, net of tax, or $0.14 per share);
–     Contract settlement charges of $5,137 ($3,300, net of tax, or $0.08 per share); and
–     Discrete and certain other tax benefits, net, of $8,274, or $0.19 per share.

Excluding these items from both reporting periods, 2018 Income from continuing operations would have been $32,086, or $0.76 per share compared to $18,954, or $0.44 per share, in 2017.
Griffon evaluates performance based on Earnings per share and Net income excluding restructuring charges, loss on debt extinguishment, acquisition related expenses, discrete and certain other tax items, as well other items that may affect comparability, as applicable. Griffon believes this information is useful to investors for the same reason.

34



The following table provides a reconciliation of Income from continuing operations to Adjusted income from continuing operations and Earnings per common share from continuing operations to Adjusted earnings per common share from continuing operations:
 
GRIFFON CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES
RECONCILIATION OF INCOME FROM CONTINUING OPERATIONS
TO ADJUSTED INCOME FROM CONTINUING OPERATIONS
(Unaudited) 
 
For the Years Ended September 30,
 
2019

2018

2017
Income from continuing operations
$
45,622


$
33,255


$
17,783

Adjusting items:
 


 


 

Acquisition costs


7,597


9,617

Contract settlement charges




5,137

Acquisition contingent consideration
(1,646
)




Special dividend ESOP charges

 
3,220

 

Secondary equity offering costs

 
1,205

 

Cost of life insurance benefit

 
2,614

 

Tax impact of above items
313

 
(6,421
)
 
(5,309
)
Discrete and other certain tax provisions (benefits)
2,035


(9,384
)

(8,274
)
Adjusted income from continuing operations
$
46,324


$
32,086


$
18,954










Earnings per common share from continuing operations
$
1.06


0.78


$
0.41










Adjusting items, net of tax:
 


 


 

Acquisition costs


0.12


0.14

Contract settlement charges




0.08

Acquisition contingent consideration
(0.03
)




Special dividend ESOP charges

 
0.05

 

Secondary equity offering costs

 
0.02

 

Cost of life insurance benefit

 
0.01

 

Discrete and other certain tax provisions (benefits)
0.05


(0.22
)

(0.19
)
Adjusted earnings per share from continuing operations
$
1.08


0.76


$
0.44

Weighted-average shares outstanding (in thousands)
42,888


42,422


43,011



REPORTABLE SEGMENTS

In the fourth quarter of fiscal 2019, Griffon modified its reportable segment structure to provide investors with improved visibility after a series of portfolio repositioning actions which included the divestiture of the Plastics business, the acquisition of ClosetMaid and its subsequent integration into AMES, and the acquisition of CornellCookson by Clopay. Griffon now reports its operations through three reportable segments: the newly formed Consumer and Professional Products segment, which consists of AMES; Home and Building Products, which consists of Clopay; and Defense Electronics, which consists of Telephonics Corporation.


35


Griffon evaluates performance and allocates resources based on each segment's operating results from continuing operations before interest income and expense, income taxes, depreciation and amortization, unallocated amounts (primarily corporate overhead), restructuring charges, loss on debt extinguishment and acquisition related expenses, as well as other items that may affect comparability, as applicable (“Adjusted EBITDA”, a non-GAAP measure). Griffon believes this information is useful to investors for the same reason.

See table provided in Note 18 - Reportable Segments for a reconciliation of Segment Adjusted EBITDA to Income before taxes from continuing operations.

Consumer and Professional Products
 
For the Years Ended September 30,
 
2019
 
2018
 
2017
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Revenue
$
1,000,608

 
 
 
$
953,612

 
 
 
$
545,269

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Adjusted EBITDA
$
90,677

 
9.1
%
 
$
77,061

 
8.1
%
 
$
45,002

 
8.3
%
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Depreciation and amortization
32,289

 
 
 
30,816

 
 
 
25,207

 
 
 

2019 Compared to 2018

CPP revenue in 2019 increased $46,996, or 5%, compared to 2018, driven by increased revenue from pricing and mix of 3% and volume of 4%, partially offset by a 2% unfavorable impact due to foreign exchange.

CPP Adjusted EBITDA in 2019 increased 18% to $90,677 compared to $77,061 in 2018, primarily driven by the increased revenue as noted above, partially offset by increased material and tariff costs. Depreciation and amortization increased $1,473 from 2018, primarily from acquisitions.

Strategic Initiative

Griffon is developing a next-generation business platform for The AMES Companies and its ClosetMaid business (collectively "CPP") to enhance the growth, efficiency, and competitiveness of its U.S. operations.

This initiative includes three key development areas. First, multiple independent information systems will be unified into a single data and analytics platform which will serve the whole CPP U.S. enterprise. Second, certain CPP U.S. operations will be consolidated to optimize facilities footprint and talent. Third, strategic investments in automation and facilities expansion will be made to increase the efficiency of our manufacturing and fulfillment operations, and support e-commerce growth.

The roll-out of the new business platform will occur over approximately a three-year period, with completion expected by the end of calendar 2022. When fully implemented, these actions will result in an annual cash savings of $15,000 to $20,000, and a $20,000 to $25,000 reduction in inventory at current operating levels.

The cost to implement this new business platform, over the three-year duration of the project, will include approximately $35,000 of one-time charges and approximately $40,000 in capital investments. The one-time charges are comprised of $16,000 of cash charges, which includes $12,000 personnel-related costs such as training, severance, and duplicate personnel costs as well as $4,000 of facility and lease exit costs. The remaining $19,000 of charges are non-cash and are primarily related to asset write-downs.

2018 Compared to 2017

CPP revenue in 2018 increased $408,343, or 75%, compared to 2017 with 73% due to the acquisitions of La Hacienda, Tuscan Path, ClosetMaid ("CM"), Harper and Kelkay, as well as increased revenue from favorable mix and pricing of 2%. Organic growth was 2%. 2018 CM revenue was $311,568.

CPP Adjusted EBITDA in 2018 was $77,061 compared to $45,002 in 2017, an increase of $32,059, or 71%, primarily driven by the increased revenue as noted above, partially offset by increased steel and resin costs, and tariffs. Depreciation and amortization increased $5,609 from 2017, primarily from acquisitions.

36



2018 and 2017 acquisitions

On February 13, 2018, AMES acquired Kelkay, a leading United Kingdom manufacturer and distributor of decorative outdoor landscaping products sold to garden centers, retailers and grocers in the UK and Ireland for approximately $56,118 (GBP 40,452), subject to contingent consideration of up to GBP 7,000. In 2019, GBP 1,300 was reversed into income as it was highly probable a portion of the contingent consideration would not be earned; this benefit was excluded from CPP Adjusted EBITDA. This acquisition broadened AMES' product offerings in the market and increased its in-country operational footprint. Kelkay contributed approximately $35,000 in revenue in the first twelve months after the acquisition.

On November 6, 2017, AMES acquired Harper Brush Works (“Harper”), a division of Horizon Global, for approximately $5,000. Harper is a leading U.S. manufacturer of cleaning products for professional, home, and industrial use. The acquisition will broaden AMES’ long-handle tool offering in North America to include brooms, brushes, and other cleaning tools and accessories. Harper, as expected, generated approximately $10,000 in revenue in the first twelve months after the acquisition.

On October 2, 2017, Griffon completed the acquisition of ClosetMaid, a market leader of home storage and organization products, for approximately $185,700, inclusive of post-closing adjustments, or $165,000 net of the estimated present value of tax benefits resulting from the transaction. ClosetMaid adds to Griffon's Home and Building Products segment, complementing and diversifying Griffon's portfolio of leading consumer brands and products. ClosetMaid, as expected, generated over $300,000 in revenue in the first twelve months after the acquisition.

On September 29, 2017, AMES Australia completed the acquisition of Tuscan Landscape Group Pty, Ltd. ("Tuscan Path"), a leading Australian provider of pots, planters, pavers, decorative stone, and garden decor products, for approximately $18,000 (AUD 22,250). The acquisition of Tuscan Path broadens AMES' outdoor living and lawn and garden business, and will strengthen AMES' industry leading position in Australia. Tuscan Path, as expected, generated approximately AUD 25,000 of revenue in the first twelve months after the acquisition.

On July 31, 2017, The AMES Companies, Inc. acquired La Hacienda Limited, a leading United Kingdom outdoor living brand of unique heating and garden decor products, for approximately $11,400 (GBP 9,175). The acquisition of La Hacienda broadens AMES' global outdoor living and lawn and garden business and supports AMES' UK expansion strategy. La Hacienda, as expected, generated approximately GBP 14,000 of revenue in the first twelve months after the acquisition.
Home and Building Products
 
For the Years Ended September 30,
 
2019
 
2018
 
2017
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Revenue
$
873,640

 
 
 
$
697,969

 
 
 
$
568,001

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Adjusted EBITDA
$
120,161

 
13.8
%
 
$
100,339

 
14.4
%
 
$
81,764

 
14.4
%
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Depreciation and amortization
18,334

 
 
 
13,717

 
 
 
11,340

 
 

2019 Compared to 2018

HBP revenue in 2019 increased $175,671, or 25%, compared to 2018, with 19% due to the acquisition of CornellCookson, 5% from favorable mix and pricing and 1% from increased volume. Organic growth was 6%. CornellCookson revenue was $202,742.

HBP Adjusted EBITDA in 2019 increased 20% to $120,161 compared to $100,339 in 2018, primarily driven by the increased revenue as noted above, partially offset by increased material and tariff costs. Depreciation and amortization increased $4,617 from 2018, primarily from acquisitions.

On Janua